1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Changes in Bone Mass After Discontinuation of Preexposure Prophylaxis With Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate/Emtricitabine in Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: Extension Phase Results of Adolescent Trials Network Protocols 110 and 113

      brief-report

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Human immunodeficiency virus–seronegative men aged 15–22 years who lost bone mineral density (BMD) during tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) showed BMD recovery 48 weeks following PrEP discontinuation. Lumbar spine and whole body BMD z-scores remained below baseline 48 weeks off PrEP in participants aged 15–19 years.

          Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01772823 (ATN 110) and NCT01769456 (ATN 113).

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clin Infect Dis
          Clin. Infect. Dis
          cid
          Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
          Oxford University Press (US )
          1058-4838
          1537-6591
          15 February 2020
          08 June 2019
          08 June 2020
          : 70
          : 4
          : 687-691
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin/Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin , Milwaukee
          [2 ] Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham
          [3 ] Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham
          [4 ] Westat , Rockville, Maryland
          [5 ] Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus , Aurora
          [6 ] Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles
          [7 ] Maternal and Pediatric Infectious Disease Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development , Bethesda, Maryland
          [8 ] Department of Psychiatry, Stroger Hospital of Cook County , Chicago, Illinois
          [9 ] Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital
          Author notes
          Correspondence: P. L. Havens, Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Suite C450, 999 North 92nd Street, Milwaukee, WI 53226 ( phavens@ 123456mcw.edu ).
          Article
          PMC7319267 PMC7319267 7319267 ciz486
          10.1093/cid/ciz486
          7319267
          31179503
          © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

          This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model ( https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

          Page count
          Pages: 5
          Funding
          Funded by: National Institutes of Health, DOI 10.13039/100000002;
          Award ID: U01 HD040533
          Award ID: U01 HD040474
          Funded by: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, DOI 10.13039/100009633;
          Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse, DOI 10.13039/100000026;
          Funded by: National Institute of Mental Health, DOI 10.13039/100000025;
          Funded by: Gilead Sciences, DOI 10.13039/100005564;
          Categories
          Brief Reports
          AcademicSubjects/MED00290

          Comments

          Comment on this article