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      Influence of infection at the time of root filling on the outcome of endodontic treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis

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      International Endodontic Journal

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          This study investigated the role of infection on the prognosis of endodontic therapy by following-up teeth that had had their canals cleaned and obturated during a single appointment. The root canals of 55 single-rooted teeth with apical periodontitis were thoroughly instrumented and irrigated with sodium hypochlorite solution. Using advanced anaerobic bacteriological techniques, post-instrumentation samples were taken and the teeth were then root-filled during the same appointment. All teeth were initially infected; after instrumentation low numbers of bacteria were detected in 22 of 55 root canals. Periapical healing was followed-up for 5 years. Complete periapical healing occurred in 94% of cases that yielded a negative culture. Where the samples were positive prior to root filling, the success rate of treatment was just 68%--a statistically significant difference. Further investigation of three failures revealed the presence of Actinomyces species in each case; no other specific bacteria were implicated in failure cases. These findings emphasize the importance of completely eliminating bacteria from the root canal system before obturation. This objective cannot be reliably achieved in a one-visit treatment because it is not possible to eradicate all infection from the root canal without the support of an inter-appointment antimicrobial dressing.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Factors affecting the long-term results of endodontic treatment.

          The influence of various factors that may affect the outcome of root canal therapy was evaluated in 356 patients 8 to 10 yr after the treatment. The results of treatment were directly dependent on the preoperative status of the pulp and periapical tissues. The rate of success for cases with vital or nonvital pulps but having no periapical radiolucency exceeded 96%, whereas only 86% of the cases with pulp necrosis and periapical radiolucency showed apical healing. The possibility of instrumenting the root canal to its full length and the level of root filling significantly affected the outcome of treatment. Of all of the periapical lesions present on previously root-filled teeth, only 62% healed after retreatment. The predictability from clinical and radiographic signs of the treatment-outcome in individual cases with preoperative periapical lesions cases was found to be low. Thus, factors which were not measured or identified may be critical to the outcome of endodontic treatment.
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            The antibacterial effect of camphorated paramonochlorophenol, camphorated phenol and calcium hydroxide in the treatment of infected root canals.

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              Intraradicular bacteria and fungi in root-filled, asymptomatic human teeth with therapy-resistant periapical lesions: a long-term light and electron microscopic follow-up study.

              Light and electron microscopy were used to analyze nine therapy-resistant and asymptomatic human periapical lesions, which were removed as block biopsies during surgical treatment of the affected teeth. The cases that required surgery represented about 10% of all of the cases which received endodontic treatment and root fillings during the period 1977 to 1984. These cases revealed periapical lesions when they were examined 4 to 10 yr after treatment. The biopsies were processed for correlated light and electron microscopy. Six of the nine biopsies revealed the presence of microorganisms in the apical root canal. Four contained one or more species of bacteria and two revealed yeasts. Of the four cases in which bacteria were found, only in one biopsy could they be found by light microscope. In the other three specimens, the bacterial presence could be confirmed only after repeated electron microscopic examination of the apical root canal by serial step-cutting technique. Among the three cases in which no microorganisms could be encountered, one showed histopathological features of a foreign body giant cell granuloma. These findings suggest that in the majority of root-filled human teeth with therapy-resistant periapical lesions, microorganisms may persist and may play a significant role in endodontic treatment failures. In certain instances such lesions may also be sustained by foreign body giant cell type of tissue responses at the periapex of root-filled teeth.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Endodontic Journal
                Wiley
                01432885
                September 1997
                October 30 2003
                : 30
                : 5
                : 297-306
                Article
                10.1046/j.1365-2591.1997.00092.x
                9477818
                © 2003

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