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      Causes and Consequences of Adynamic Bone Disease

      Nephron

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 7

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          Treatment of adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency with recombinant human GH

           B. Bengtsson (1993)
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            Bone disease in children and adolescents undergoing successful renal transplantation.

            Little is known about the extent and severity of bone disease in children undergoing successful renal transplantation. To address this issue, 47 patients with stable renal function 3.2 +/- 1.7 years after transplantation (Tx) underwent iliac crest bone biopsy. The mean age of patients was 12 +/- 2.0 years; 36 had received cadaveric renal grafts, whereas 11 had undergone living-related Tx. Immunosuppressive drugs included cyclosporine 0.17 +/- 0.4 mg/kg/day, prednisone 7.5 +/- 2.1 mg/kg/day, and either azathioprine 1.6 +/- 0.9 mg/kg/day or mycophenolate mofetil 30 +/- 3 mg/kg/day. In addition to quantitative bone histomorphometry, the bone mineral content (BMC) of the lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 24/47 patients. Thirty-one transplant recipients had normal bone formation (N-Bfr), 11 had mild hyperparathyroidism (HPT) and 5 had adynamic skeletal lesions (AD). The interval since Tx, duration of dialysis before Tx and cumulative prednisone dose did not differ among groups. Trabecular bone area was highest in subjects with HPT. Unexpectedly, eroded bone perimeter exceeded normal reference values both in patients with AD and in those with N-Bfr; the osteoid area and osteoid perimeter were also elevated in these two groups. Hyperparathyroidism improved or resolved after Tx in all 14 subjects with this skeletal lesion prior to Tx, but one patient developed AD after Tx. Bone histology did not change after Tx in those with N-Bfr during regular dialysis, but bone formation increased after Tx in two of three patients with AD during regular dialysis. Z-scores for height in pre-pubertal patients after Tx were below age-appropriate values in each histologic subgroup, but values did not differ among groups. Z-scores for bone mineral content at the lumbar spine were also less than age-predicted values, -0.67 +/- 1.2. After adjusting for the degree of growth retardation, height-adjusted z-scores for lumbar spine BMC after Tx were above normal in all three histologic groups (0.68 +/- 1.0). The results suggest that reductions in bone mass and post-transplant osteoporosis are not prominent findings in pediatric renal transplant recipients when the influence of growth retardation on bone mass measurements by DXA is carefully considered.
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              Diminished linear growth during intermittent calcitriol therapy in children undergoing CCPD.

              Daily calcitriol therapy has been reported to improve linear growth in children with renal bone disease, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is a key regultor of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Whereas large intermittent doses of calcitriol can lower serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and reverse the skeletal changes of secondary hyperparathyroidism, the impact of intermittent calcitriol therapy on linear growth in children is not known. Thus, we studied 16 pre-pubertal patients with bone biopsy-proven secondary hyperparathyroidism who completed a 12-month prospective clinical trial of intermittent calcitriol therapy. Biochemical results and growth data obtained during intermittent calcitriol therapy were compared to values determined during the preceding 12 months of daily calcitriol therapy in each study subject; changes in bone histology were assessed after one year of intermittent calcitriol therapy. Z-scores for height did not change during 12 months of daily calcitriol therapy. Although the skeletal lesions of secondary hyperparathyroidism improved in most patients, Z-scores for height decreased from -1.8 +/- 0.32 to -2.0 +/- 0.33, P < 0.01, during intermittent calcitriol therapy. The largest reductions were seen in patients who developed adynamic bone lesions after 12 months of treatment. Delta Z-scores for height correlated with serum PTH, r = 0.71, P < 0.01, and alkaline phosphatase levels, r = 0.67, P < 0.01, during intermittent calcitriol therapy but not during daily calcitriol therapy. The data suggest that high dose intermittent calcitriol therapy adversely affects linear growth, particularly in patients with the adynamic lesion. The higher doses of calcitriol or the intermittent schedule of calcitriol administration may directly inhibit chondrocyte activity within growth plate cartilage of children with end-stage renal disease.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEF
                Nephron
                10.1159/issn.1660-8151
                Nephron
                S. Karger AG
                1660-8151
                2235-3186
                2001
                2001
                25 May 2001
                : 88
                : 2
                : 97-106
                Affiliations
                Department of Nephrology, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark
                Article
                45968 Nephron 2001;88:97–106
                10.1159/000045968
                11399910
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 1, References: 147, Pages: 10
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/45968
                Categories
                Editorial Review

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

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