10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Gold Nanoparticle Sensor for the Visual Detection of Pork Adulteration in Meatball Formulation

      , , , ,

      Journal of Nanomaterials

      Hindawi Limited

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We visually identify pork adulteration in beef and chicken meatball preparations using 20 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensors. Meatball is a popular food in certain Asian and European countries. Verification of pork adulteration in meatball is necessary to meet the Halal and Kosher food standards. Twenty nm GNPs change color from pinkish-red to gray-purple, and their absorption peak at 525 nm is red-shifted by 30–50 nm in 3 mM phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Adsorption of single-stranded DNA protects the particles against salt-induced aggregation. Mixing and annealing of a 25-nucleotide (nt) single-stranded (ss) DNA probe with denatured DNA of different meatballs differentiated well between perfectly matched and mismatch hybridization at a critical annealing temperature. The probes become available in nonpork DNA containing vials due to mismatches and interact with GNPs to protect them from salt-induced aggregation. Whereas, all the pork containing vials, either in pure and mixed forms, consumed the probes totally by perfect hybridization and turned into grey, indicating aggregation. This is clearly reflected by a well-defined red-shift of the absorption peak and significantly increased absorbance in 550–800 nm regimes. This label-free low-cost assay should find applications in food analysis, genetic screening, and homology studies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials.

          Colloidal particles of metals and semiconductors have potentially useful optical, optoelectronic and material properties that derive from their small (nanoscopic) size. These properties might lead to applications including chemical sensors, spectroscopic enhancers, quantum dot and nanostructure fabrication, and microimaging methods. A great deal of control can now be exercised over the chemical composition, size and polydispersity of colloidal particles, and many methods have been developed for assembling them into useful aggregates and materials. Here we describe a method for assembling colloidal gold nanoparticles rationally and reversibly into macroscopic aggregates. The method involves attaching to the surfaces of two batches of 13-nm gold particles non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides capped with thiol groups, which bind to gold. When we add to the solution an oligonucleotide duplex with 'sticky ends' that are complementary to the two grafted sequences, the nanoparticles self-assemble into aggregates. This assembly process can be reversed by thermal denaturation. This strategy should now make it possible to tailor the optical, electronic and structural properties of the colloidal aggregates by using the specificity of DNA interactions to direct the interactions between particles of different size and composition.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Determination of size and concentration of gold nanoparticles from UV-vis spectra.

            The dependence of the optical properties of spherical gold nanoparticles on particle size and wavelength were analyzed theoretically using multipole scattering theory, where the complex refractive index of gold was corrected for the effect of a reduced mean free path of the conduction electrons in small particles. To compare these theoretical results to experimental data, gold nanoparticles in the size range of 5 to 100 nm were synthesized and characterized with TEM and UV-vis. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment. It is shown that the data produced here can be used to determine both size and concentration of gold nanoparticles directly from UV-vis spectra. Equations for this purpose are derived, and the precision of various methods is discussed. The major aim of this work is to provide a simple and fast method to determine size and concentration of nanoparticles.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Nanoparticles with Raman spectroscopic fingerprints for DNA and RNA detection.

              Multiplexed detection of oligonucleotide targets has been performed with gold nanoparticle probes labeled with oligonucleotides and Raman-active dyes. The gold nanoparticles facilitate the formation of a silver coating that acts as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering promoter for the dye-labeled particles that have been captured by target molecules and an underlying chip in microarray format. The strategy provides the high-sensitivity and high-selectivity attributes of gray-scale scanometric detection but adds multiplexing and ratioing capabilities because a very large number of probes can be designed based on the concept of using a Raman tag as a narrow-band spectroscopic fingerprint. Six dissimilar DNA targets with six Raman-labeled nanoparticle probes were distinguished, as well as two RNA targets with single nucleotide polymorphisms. The current unoptimized detection limit of this method is 20 femtomolar.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Nanomaterials
                Journal of Nanomaterials
                Hindawi Limited
                1687-4110
                1687-4129
                2012
                2012
                : 2012
                :
                : 1-7
                Article
                10.1155/2012/103607
                8328053c-b98b-4a63-ad93-33838caae8ed
                © 2012

                Comments

                Comment on this article