Blog
About

38
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Flying Squirrel–associated Typhus, United States

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In March 2002, typhus fever was diagnosed in two patients residing in West Virginia and Georgia. Both patients were hospitalized with severe febrile illnesses, and both had been recently exposed to or had physical contact with flying squirrels or flying squirrel nests. Laboratory results indicated Rickettsia prowazekii infection.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemic typhus meningitis in the southwestern United States.

           R Massung,  L Davis,  K Slater (2001)
          A patient residing in New Mexico had murine typhus diagnosed. A novel molecular assay was performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Rickettsia prowazekii, the agent of epidemic typhus, was found, rather than R. typhi. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of epidemic typhus confirmed by means of polymerase chain reaction--based testing of cerebrospinal fluid, and it introduces a novel assay for the molecular diagnosis of both epidemic and murine typhus.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Epidemic typhus rickettsiae isolated from flying squirrels.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Epidemic typhus in the United States associated with flying squirrels.

              Between July 1977 and January 1980, seven cases of sporadic, nonepidemic "epidemic" typhus (Rickettsia prowazekii) were discovered in Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. The reservoir seemed to be the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans), an animal indigenous to the eastern United States; however, the vector or mode of acquisition was not evident. Diagnosis was established principally through complement fixation, indirect immunofluorescence, and toxin neutralization tests. Patients' ages were 11 to 81 years. Most were white women. Six had abrupt onset of illness. Headaches, fever, myalgias, and exanthems were among the presenting complaints. The disease seemed milder than classic louse-born epidemic typhus, but in some instances, it was life-threatening. All patients responded to tetracycline or chloramphenicol. This entity probably is more common than reported, is difficult to recognize, and is produced by an organism seemingly identical to that producing louse-born epidemic typhus.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Emerg Infect Dis
                EID
                Emerging Infectious Diseases
                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                1080-6040
                1080-6059
                October 2003
                : 9
                : 10
                : 1341-1343
                Affiliations
                [* ]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
                []Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia, USA
                []Atlanta I.D. Group, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
                [§ ]West Virginia Division of Public Health, Charleston, West Virginia, USA
                []Georgia Division of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Mary G. Reynolds; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop G13, Atlanta, GA 30338; fax: 404-639-2118; email: nzr6@ 123456cdc.gov
                Article
                03-0278
                10.3201/eid0910.030278
                3033063
                14609478
                Categories
                Dispatch

                Infectious disease & Microbiology

                Comments

                Comment on this article