Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: not found

A Feasibility Study of Bilateral Anodal Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex Using High-Definition Electrodes in Healthy Participants

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPMC
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) studies often use one anode to increase cortical excitability in one hemisphere. However, mental processes may involve cortical regions in both hemispheres. This study’s aim was to assess the safety and possible effects on affect and working memory of tDCS using two anodes for bifrontal stimulation. A group of healthy subjects participated in two bifrontal tDCS sessions on two different days, one for real and the other for sham stimulation. They performed a working memory task and reported their affect immediately before and after each tDCS session. Relative to sham, real bifrontal stimulation did not induce significant adverse effects, reduced decrement in vigor-activity during the study session, and did not improve working memory. These preliminary findings suggest that bifrontal anodal stimulation is feasible and safe and may reduce task-related fatigue in healthy participants. Its effects on neuropsychiatric patients deserve further study.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 64

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Transcranial direct current stimulation: State of the art 2008.

      Effects of weak electrical currents on brain and neuronal function were first described decades ago. Recently, DC polarization of the brain was reintroduced as a noninvasive technique to alter cortical activity in humans. Beyond this, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of different cortical areas has been shown, in various studies, to result in modifications of perceptual, cognitive, and behavioral functions. Moreover, preliminary data suggest that it can induce beneficial effects in brain disorders. Brain stimulation with weak direct currents is a promising tool in human neuroscience and neurobehavioral research. To facilitate and standardize future tDCS studies, we offer this overview of the state of the art for tDCS.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Excitability changes induced in the human motor cortex by weak transcranial direct current stimulation.

        In this paper we demonstrate in the intact human the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of weak direct current through the scalp. Excitability changes of up to 40 %, revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation, were accomplished and lasted for several minutes after the end of current stimulation. Excitation could be achieved selectively by anodal stimulation, and inhibition by cathodal stimulation. By varying the current intensity and duration, the strength and duration of the after-effects could be controlled. The effects were probably induced by modification of membrane polarisation. Functional alterations related to post-tetanic potentiation, short-term potentiation and processes similar to postexcitatory central inhibition are the likely candidates for the excitability changes after the end of stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation using weak current may thus be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, reversible, selective and focal way.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Physiological basis of transcranial direct current stimulation.

          Since the rediscovery of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) about 10 years ago, interest in tDCS has grown exponentially. A noninvasive stimulation technique that induces robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex, tDCS is increasingly being used in proof-of-principle and stage IIa clinical trials in a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Alongside these clinical studies, detailed work has been performed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the observed effects. In this review, the authors bring together the results from these pharmacological, neurophysiological, and imaging studies to describe their current knowledge of the physiological effects of tDCS. In addition, the theoretical framework for how tDCS affects motor learning is proposed.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [a ]Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
            [b ]Department of Biomedical Engineering, City University of New York, City College, New York, New York
            [c ]Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
            [d ]Department of Neurobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
            Author notes
            [* ]To whom all correspondence should be addressed: Jiansong Xu, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 1 Church St., Room 729, New Haven, CT 06519; Tele: 203-785-5306; Fax: 203-737-3591; Email: Jiansong.xu@ 123456yale.edu .
            Journal
            Yale J Biol Med
            Yale J Biol Med
            yjbm
            YJBM
            The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine
            YJBM
            0044-0086
            1551-4056
            03 September 2015
            September 2015
            : 88
            : 3
            : 219-225
            4553641 yjbm883219
            Copyright ©2015, Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License, which permits for noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any digital medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not altered in any way.

            Categories
            Original Contribution
            Focus: Addiction

            Medicine

            affect, tdcs, non-invasive brain stimulation, cognitive function, working memory

            Comments

            Comment on this article