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      A Nonword Repetition Task to Assess Bilingual Children’s Phonology

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      Language Acquisition
      Informa UK Limited

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          Nonword repetition and child language impairment.

          A brief, processing-dependent, nonword repetition task, designed to minimize biases associated with traditional language tests, was investigated. In Study 1, no overlap in nonword repetition performance was found between a group of 20 school-age children enrolled in language intervention (LI) and a group of 20 age-matched peers developing language normally (LN). In Study 2, a comparison of likelihood ratios for the nonword repetition task and for a traditional language test revealed that nonword repetition distinguished between children independently identified as LI and LN with a high degree of accuracy, by contrast with the traditional language test. Nonword repetition may have considerable clinical utility as a screening measure for language impairment in children. Information on the likelihood ratios associated with all diagnostic tests of language is badly needed.
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            Short-term and working memory in specific language impairment.

            Investigations of the cognitive processes underlying specific language impairment (SLI) have implicated deficits in the storage and processing of phonological information, but to date these abilities have not been studied in the same group of children with SLI. To examine the extent to which deficits in immediate verbal short-term and working memory may co-occur in a group of children with SLI. Twenty children aged 7-11 years with SLI completed a comprehensive battery of short-term and working memory, as well as two phonological awareness tasks. The majority of the group had deficits in both verbal short-term and working memory, which persisted after the general language abilities of the children were taken into account. A substantial minority showed deficits on visuospatial short-term memory, while impairments of phonological awareness were less marked. The data indicate dual deficits in verbal short-term and working memory that exceed criterial language abilities characteristic of SLI and may plausibly underpin some of the language learning difficulties experienced by these children.
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              Selection of Preschool Language Tests

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Language Acquisition
                Language Acquisition
                Informa UK Limited
                1048-9223
                1532-7817
                July 19 2017
                November 30 2016
                :
                :
                : 1-14
                Article
                10.1080/10489223.2016.1243692
                8419d1cb-5757-47b5-80a3-78a2c7ee1cbc
                © 2017
                History

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