Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Lipoprotein (a) interactions with cholesterol-containing lipids on angiographic coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic total occlusion

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          We investigated whether or to what extent the interaction of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] with cholesterol-containing lipids was associated with angiographic coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic total occlusion.

          Methods

          Serum levels of Lp(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglyceride were determined and non-HDL-C was calculated in 706 type 2 diabetic and 578 non-diabetic patients with stable coronary artery disease and angiographic total occlusion of at least one major coronary artery. The degree of collaterals supplying the distal aspect of a total occlusion from the contra-lateral vessel was graded as poor (Rentrop score of 0 or 1) or good coronary collateralization (Rentrop score of 2 or 3).

          Results

          For diabetic and non-diabetic patients, Lp(a), total cholesterol, LDL-C, and non-HDL-C levels were higher in patients with poor coronary collateralization than in those with good collateralization, whereas HDL-C and triglyceride levels were similar. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, tertiles of Lp(a), total cholesterol, LDL-C and non-HDL-C remained independent determinants for poor collateralization. A significant interaction between Lp(a) and total cholesterol, LDL-C or non-HDL-C was observed in diabetic patients (all P interaction < 0.001) but not in non-diabetics. At high tertile of total cholesterol (≥ 5.35 mmol/L), LDL-C (≥ 3.36 mmol/L) and non-HDL-C (≥ 4.38 mmol/L), diabetic patients with high tertile of Lp(a) (≥ 30.23 mg/dL) had an increased risk of poor collateralization compared with those with low tertile of Lp(a) (< 12.66 mg/dL) (adjusted OR = 4.300, 3.970 and 4.386, respectively, all P < 0.001).

          Conclusions

          Increased Lp(a) confers greater risk for poor coronary collateralization when total cholesterol, LDL-C or non-HDL-C are elevated especially for patients with type 2 diabetes.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (10.1186/s12933-019-0888-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 61

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A new equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate.

          Equations to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are routinely used to assess kidney function. Current equations have limited precision and systematically underestimate measured GFR at higher values. To develop a new estimating equation for GFR: the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Cross-sectional analysis with separate pooled data sets for equation development and validation and a representative sample of the U.S. population for prevalence estimates. Research studies and clinical populations ("studies") with measured GFR and NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), 1999 to 2006. 8254 participants in 10 studies (equation development data set) and 3896 participants in 16 studies (validation data set). Prevalence estimates were based on 16,032 participants in NHANES. GFR, measured as the clearance of exogenous filtration markers (iothalamate in the development data set; iothalamate and other markers in the validation data set), and linear regression to estimate the logarithm of measured GFR from standardized creatinine levels, sex, race, and age. In the validation data set, the CKD-EPI equation performed better than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation, especially at higher GFR (P < 0.001 for all subsequent comparisons), with less bias (median difference between measured and estimated GFR, 2.5 vs. 5.5 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)), improved precision (interquartile range [IQR] of the differences, 16.6 vs. 18.3 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)), and greater accuracy (percentage of estimated GFR within 30% of measured GFR, 84.1% vs. 80.6%). In NHANES, the median estimated GFR was 94.5 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (IQR, 79.7 to 108.1) vs. 85.0 (IQR, 72.9 to 98.5) mL/min per 1.73 m(2), and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was 11.5% (95% CI, 10.6% to 12.4%) versus 13.1% (CI, 12.1% to 14.0%). The sample contained a limited number of elderly people and racial and ethnic minorities with measured GFR. The CKD-EPI creatinine equation is more accurate than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation and could replace it for routine clinical use. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Executive Summary of The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, And Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol In Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III).

              (2001)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Standards of medical care in diabetes--2014.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                ruijindfh@126.com
                rjshenweifeng@126.com
                Journal
                Cardiovasc Diabetol
                Cardiovasc Diabetol
                Cardiovascular Diabetology
                BioMed Central (London )
                1475-2840
                24 June 2019
                24 June 2019
                2019
                : 18
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0368 8293, GRID grid.16821.3c, Department of Cardiology, Rui Jin Hospital, , Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, ; Shanghai, 200025 People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0368 8293, GRID grid.16821.3c, Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, , Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, ; 197 Rui Jin Road II, Shanghai, 200025 People’s Republic of China
                Article
                888
                10.1186/s12933-019-0888-z
                6589890
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Funding
                Funded by: the Research Foundation of Chinese National Natural Science
                Award ID: 81670451
                Award ID: 81770437
                Award ID: 81770447
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Shanghai Science & Technology Committee
                Award ID: 14ZR1425800
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Medico-engineering Project
                Award ID: GY2016MS66
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Talent Young Investigators of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine
                Award ID: 17XJ11009
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Shanghai Municipal Education Commission-Gaofeng Clinical Medicine Grant Support
                Award ID: 20181801
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Original Investigation
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article