124
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Investigating Radical Deaths and the Cultures That Practiced Them: New AHRC Funded Research at the Institute of Archaeology

      , 1 , 1 , 2

      Archaeology International

      Ubiquity Press

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A new Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project brings together multiple strands of investigation to probe the relationship between ritual, violence, and early state formation. David Wengrow and Brenna Hassett will coordinate an international team combining biomolecular analysis (stable isotopes, ancient DNA), bioarchaeology, and archaeology to examine a remarkable set of Early Bronze Age funerary deposits (c. 3100–2800 BC), excavated at the multi-period site of Başur Höyük, in South-eastern Turkey. They include evidence of extraordinary wealth combined with radically new cultural practices, such as mass death pits and burials of retainers or other human victims. Such findings add to a growing body of archaeological data from the Middle East, which is now prompting researchers to rethink key aspects of social and political change at the start of the Bronze Age.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A Fourth Millennium Temple/Palace Complex at Arslantepe-Malatya. North-South Relations and the Formation of Early State Societies in the Northern Regions of Greater Mesopotamia

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Human sacrifice and intentional corpse preservation in the Royal Cemetery of Ur

            The Royal Tombs at Ur have been long famous for their chilling scenario of young soldiers and courtesans who loyally took poison to die with their mistress. The authors investigate two of the original skulls with CT scans and propose a procedure no less chilling, but more enforceable. The victims were participants in an elaborate funerary ritual during which they were felled with a sharp instrument, heated, embalmed with mercury, dressed and laid ceremonially in rows.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Siirt-Başur Höyük 2012 Yılı Çalışmaları. Kazı Sonuçları Toplantısı 3, 2014 Cilt, Muğla Kazı Sonuçları Toplantısı 3

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2048-4194
                Archaeology International
                Ubiquity Press
                2048-4194
                17 January 2020
                2019
                : 22
                : 1
                : 61-65
                Affiliations
                [1 ]UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H 0PY, GB
                [2 ]Ege University, Faculty of Letters, Department of Archaeology, Bornova-İZMİR, TR
                Article
                10.5334/ai-398
                Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Research update

                Archaeology, Cultural studies

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                Archaeology International
                Volume 22, Issue 1

                Similar content 162

                Most referenced authors 26