Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Blastocystis prevalence and subtypes in autochthonous and immigrant patients in a referral centre for parasitic infections in Italy

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In this study we characterized the presence and subtype (ST1-ST4) of Blastocystis in patients attended at a referral center for tropical diseases in Northern Italy. We also, evaluated the organism’s association with other intestinal parasites. Parasite screening was performed on 756 patients, from different geographical origins (namely, Italians, Africans, South Americans, Asian and non-Italian Europeans) in which Italians represented the largest group. Blastocystis was seen to be the most prevalent parasite in the study. Subtype 3 and 1 were the most frequently found in the Italians and Africans. Our data confirmed previous studies performed in Italy, in which ST3 proved to be the most prevalent subtype, but we highlighted also a high frequency of mixed subtypes, which were probably underestimated in former analyses. Interestingly, the mixed subtypes group was the most prevalent in all the analysed geographical areas. About half of our cases showed other co-infecting parasites and the most frequent was Dientamoeba fragilis. Our study confirms that, in Blastocystis infection, multiple subtypes and co-infecting parasites are very frequently present, in particular Dientamoeba fragilis.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          New insights on classification, identification, and clinical relevance of Blastocystis spp.

           Kevin S W Tan (2008)
          Blastocystis is an unusual enteric protozoan parasite of humans and many animals. It has a worldwide distribution and is often the most commonly isolated organism in parasitological surveys. The parasite has been described since the early 1900s, but only in the last decade or so have there been significant advances in our understanding of Blastocystis biology. However, the pleomorphic nature of the parasite and the lack of standardization in techniques have led to confusion and, in some cases, misinterpretation of data. This has hindered laboratory diagnosis and efforts to understand its mode of reproduction, life cycle, prevalence, and pathogenesis. Accumulating epidemiological, in vivo, and in vitro data strongly suggest that Blastocystis is a pathogen. Many genotypes exist in nature, and recent observations indicate that humans are, in reality, hosts to numerous zoonotic genotypes. Such genetic diversity has led to a suggestion that previously conflicting observations on the pathogenesis of Blastocystis are due to pathogenic and nonpathogenic genotypes. Recent epidemiological, animal infection, and in vitro host-Blastocystis interaction studies suggest that this may indeed be the case. This review focuses on such recent advances and also provides updates on laboratory and clinical aspects of Blastocystis spp.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Genetic diversity of blastocystis in livestock and zoo animals.

            Blastocystis is a common unicellular anaerobic eukaryote that inhabits the large intestine of many animals worldwide, including humans. The finding of Blastocystis in faeces in mammals and birds has led to proposals of zoonotic potential and that these hosts may be the source of many human infections. Blastocystis is, however, a genetically diverse complex of many distinct organisms (termed subtypes; STs), and sampling to date has been limited, both geographically and in the range of hosts studied. In order to expand our understanding of host specificity of Blastocystis STs, 557 samples were examined from various non-primate animal hosts and from a variety of different countries in Africa, Asia and Europe. STs were identified using 'barcoding' of the small subunit rRNA gene using DNA extracted either from culture or directly from faeces. The host and geographic range of several STs has thereby been greatly expanded and the evidence suggests that livestock is not a major contributor to human infection. Two new STs were detected among the barcode sequences obtained; for these, and for three others where the data were incomplete, the corresponding genes were fully sequenced and phylogenetic analysis was undertaken. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              DNA barcoding of blastocystis.

              We have developed a simple method for subtyping the intestinal protistan parasite Blastocystis using an approach equivalent to DNA barcoding in animals. Amplification of a 600 bp region of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene followed by single primer sequencing of the PCR product provides enough data to assign isolates to specific subtypes unambiguously. We believe that this approach will prove useful in future epidemiological studies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: InvestigationRole: Methodology
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Methodology
                Role: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: MethodologyRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                7 January 2019
                2019
                : 14
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (Vr), Italy
                [2 ] Institute of Infectious Diseases and Public Health, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy
                Charles University, CZECH REPUBLIC
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-18-15203
                10.1371/journal.pone.0210171
                6322732
                30615638
                © 2019 Piubelli et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, Pages: 9
                Product
                Funding
                The authors received no specific funding for this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Protozoans
                Parasitic Protozoans
                Blastocystis
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Parasitic Diseases
                Parasitic Intestinal Diseases
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Parasitology
                Intestinal Parasites
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Molecular Biology
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Artificial Gene Amplification and Extension
                Polymerase Chain Reaction
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Artificial Gene Amplification and Extension
                Polymerase Chain Reaction
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Ethnicities
                European People
                Italian People
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Protozoans
                Parasitic Protozoans
                Dientamoeba Fragilis
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Parasitic Diseases
                People and places
                Geographical locations
                Europe
                European Union
                Italy
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article