156
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Shank3 mutant mice display autistic-like behaviours and striatal dysfunction

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) comprise a range of disorders that share a core of neurobehavioural deficits characterized by widespread abnormalities in social interactions, deficits in communication as well as restricted interests and repetitive behaviours. The neurological basis and circuitry mechanisms underlying these abnormal behaviours are poorly understood. Shank3 is a postsynaptic protein, whose disruption at the genetic level is thought to be responsible for development of 22q13 deletion syndrome (Phelan-McDermid Syndrome) and other non-syndromic ASDs. Here we show that mice with Shank3 gene deletions exhibit self-injurious repetitive grooming and deficits in social interaction. Cellular, electrophysiological and biochemical analyses uncovered defects at striatal synapses and cortico-striatal circuits in Shank3 mutant mice. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for Shank3 in the normal development of neuronal connectivity and establish causality between a disruption in the Shank3 gene and the genesis of autistic like-behaviours in mice.

          Related collections

          Most cited references47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Morris water maze: procedures for assessing spatial and related forms of learning and memory.

          The Morris water maze (MWM) is a test of spatial learning for rodents that relies on distal cues to navigate from start locations around the perimeter of an open swimming arena to locate a submerged escape platform. Spatial learning is assessed across repeated trials and reference memory is determined by preference for the platform area when the platform is absent. Reversal and shift trials enhance the detection of spatial impairments. Trial-dependent, latent and discrimination learning can be assessed using modifications of the basic protocol. Search-to-platform area determines the degree of reliance on spatial versus non-spatial strategies. Cued trials determine whether performance factors that are unrelated to place learning are present. Escape from water is relatively immune from activity or body mass differences, making it ideal for many experimental models. The MWM has proven to be a robust and reliable test that is strongly correlated with hippocampal synaptic plasticity and NMDA receptor function. We present protocols for performing variants of the MWM test, from which results can be obtained from individual animals in as few as 6 days.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Advances in autism genetics: on the threshold of a new neurobiology.

            Autism is a heterogeneous syndrome defined by impairments in three core domains: social interaction, language and range of interests. Recent work has led to the identification of several autism susceptibility genes and an increased appreciation of the contribution of de novo and inherited copy number variation. Promising strategies are also being applied to identify common genetic risk variants. Systems biology approaches, including array-based expression profiling, are poised to provide additional insights into this group of disorders, in which heterogeneity, both genetic and phenotypic, is emerging as a dominant theme.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Mutations of the X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 are associated with autism.

              Many studies have supported a genetic etiology for autism. Here we report mutations in two X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 in siblings with autism-spectrum disorders. These mutations affect cell-adhesion molecules localized at the synapse and suggest that a defect of synaptogenesis may predispose to autism.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                0410462
                6011
                Nature
                Nature
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                3 March 2011
                20 March 2011
                28 April 2011
                28 October 2011
                : 472
                : 7344
                : 437-442
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
                [2 ] PhD Programme in Biomedicine and Experimental Biology (BEB), Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
                [3 ] Gulbenkian PhD Programme in Biomedicine, Gulbenkian Science Institute, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal
                [4 ] Department of Radiology, and Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
                [5 ] Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
                [6 ] Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA
                [7 ] McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author: Guoping Feng ( fengg@ 123456mit.edu )
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                nihpa275551
                10.1038/nature09965
                3090611
                21423165
                84c48dad-de4c-4dd8-ab65-f3f8648b5a8f

                Users may view, print, copy, download and text and data- mine the content in such documents, for the purposes of academic research, subject always to the full Conditions of use: http://www.nature.com/authors/editorial_policies/license.html#terms

                History
                Funding
                Funded by: National Institute of Mental Health : NIMH
                Award ID: R01 MH081201-05 ||MH
                Categories
                Article

                Uncategorized
                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article