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      Variation in the distribution of Corbicula species (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) after 25 years of its introduction in the Río de la Plata, Argentina

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      Zoologia

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          In 1981, Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) and C. largillierti (Philippi, 1844) were recorded at the Río de la Plata River. During the 1980’s, C. largillierti was found on a continuous fringe in the shore of that river, while C. fluminea was only found North of Buenos Aires’ harbor. Ten years later, C. fluminea spread to Punta Indio, while C. largillierti remained restricted to tributary streams. The density and size frequency distribution of both species were compared with previous data from samples performed in the same area in 1985–1989. The aim of this research was to determine whether the densities of both species decreased; whether C. fluminea is still more abundant than C. largillierti; and whether the size frequency distributions indicate different population structures from those observed in the end of the 1980’s. Nine localities from the river shore were sampled, and each individual was identified and measured. The size of C. fluminea varied between 2 and 39 mm, showing the highest frequency of individuals between 20 and 25 mm; furthermore the density decreased 90% in 2015/2016. No specimens of C. largillierti were found. In conclusion, the populations of Corbicula inhabiting the Río de la Plata River are retracting.

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          Most cited references 11

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          The Role of Tourism and Recreation in the Spread of Non-Native Species: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

          Managing the pathways by which non-native species are introduced and spread is considered the most effective way of preventing species invasions. Tourism and outdoor recreation involve the frequent congregation of people, vehicles and vessels from geographically diverse areas. They are therefore perceived to be major pathways for the movement of non-native species, and ones that will become increasingly important with the continued growth of these sectors. However, a global assessment of the relationship between tourism activities and the introduction of non-native species–particularly in freshwater and marine environments–is lacking. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the impact of tourism and outdoor recreation on non-native species in terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments. Our results provide quantitative evidence that the abundance and richness of non-native species are significantly higher in sites where tourist activities take place than in control sites. The pattern was consistent across terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments; across a variety of vectors (e.g. horses, hikers, yachts); and across a range of taxonomic groups. These results highlight the need for widespread biosecurity interventions to prevent the inadvertent introduction of invasive non-native species (INNS) as the tourism and outdoor recreation sectors grow.
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            Ecosystem engineering impact of Limnoperna fortunei in South America.

            Limnoperna fortunei, or golden mussel, has invaded aquatic ecosystems in the Americas following it introduction from Southeast Asia. It is not only an aggressive invasive species, it is also a very effective ecosystem engineer, altering both ecosystem structure and function, and causes great ecological and economic impacts. This paper describes its impact as an ecosystem engineer (on benthic communities and the water column). A review of the existing scientific literature is presented, and the impact and the mechanisms by which the golden mussel modifies, maintains, and creates new environmental conditions in the invaded South American inland freshwater environments are analyzed. Understanding the ecosystem engineering roles of L. fortunei is important for its management and/or control in the invaded areas, and in cases of future invasions.
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              Ecology of an Invasive Pest Bivalve, Corbicula

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zoologia
                Zoologia
                Pensoft Publishers
                1984-4689
                December 18 2017
                December 18 2017
                : 34
                : 1-6
                Article
                10.3897/zoologia.34.e22181
                © 2017

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