3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Quadratus lumborum block versus transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic colorectal surgery : A randomized controlled trial

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background:

          This study aimed to compare the quadratus lumborum block (QLB) method with transversus abdominis plane block (TAPB) for postoperative pain management in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

          Methods:

          Seventy-four patients scheduled for laparoscopic colorectal surgery were randomly assigned into 2 groups. After surgery, patients received bilateral ultrasound-guided single-dose of QLB or TAPB. Each side was administered with 20 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine. All patients received sufentanil as patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA). Resting and moving numeric rating scale (NRS) were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 hours postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was sufentanil consumption at predetermined time intervals after surgery.

          Results:

          Patients in the QLB group used significantly less sufentanil than TAPB group at 24 and 48 hours ( P < .05), but not at 6 hours ( P = .33) after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. No significant differences in NRS results were found between the two groups at rest or during movement ( P > .05). Incidence of dizziness in the QLB group was lower than in TAPB group ( P < .05).

          Conclusions:

          The QLB is a more effective postoperative analgesia as it reduces sufentanil consumption compared to TAPB in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 20

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Quadratus Lumborum Block Versus Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Postoperative Pain After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

          Effective postoperative analgesia after cesarean delivery enhances early recovery, ambulation, and breastfeeding. In a previous study, we established the effectiveness of the quadratus lumborum block in providing pain relief after cesarean delivery compared with patient-controlled analgesia (morphine). In the current study, we hypothesized that this method would be equal to or better than the transversus abdominis plane block with regard to pain relief and its duration of action after cesarean delivery.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The Analgesic Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Adult Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

            Previous meta-analyses of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block have examined a maximum of 12 articles, including fewer than 650 participants, and have not examined the effect of ultrasound-guided techniques specifically. Recently, many trials that use ultrasound approaches to TAP block have been published, which report conflicting analgesic results. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided TAP blocks exclusively for all types of abdominal surgeries in adult patients.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Duration of analgesic effectiveness after the posterior and lateral transversus abdominis plane block techniques for transverse lower abdominal incisions: a meta-analysis.

              Both posterior and lateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block techniques provide effective early (0-12 h) postoperative analgesia after transverse incision surgery. However, whether either technique produces prolonged analgesia lasting beyond 12 h remains controversial. This meta-analysis examines the duration of analgesia associated with posterior and lateral TAP blocks in the first 48 h after lower abdominal transverse incision surgery. We retrieved randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the analgesic effects of TAP block compared with control in patients undergoing lower abdominal transverse incision surgery. Outcomes sought included interval postoperative i.v. morphine consumption and also rest and dynamic pain scores at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postoperatively. Opioid-related side-effects and patient satisfaction at 24 and 48 h were also assessed. The 12-24 h interval morphine consumption was designated as a primary outcome. Twelve RCTs including 641 patients were analysed. Four trials examined the posterior technique and eight assessed the lateral technique. Compared with control, the posterior TAP block reduced postoperative morphine consumption during the 12-24 h and 24-48 h intervals by 9.1 mg (95% CI: -16.83, -1.45; P=0.02) and 5 mg (95% CI: -9.54, -0.52; P=0.03), respectively. It also reduced rest pain scores at 24, 36, and 48 h, and also dynamic pain scores at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Differences were not significant with the lateral TAP block. Based on the comparisons with control, the posterior TAP block appears to produce more prolonged analgesia than the lateral TAP block. Future RCTs comparing these two techniques are required to confirm our findings.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                MEDI
                Medicine
                Wolters Kluwer Health
                0025-7974
                1536-5964
                December 2019
                27 December 2019
                : 98
                : 52
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Anesthesiology
                [b ]Operating Rooms, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, PR China.
                Author notes
                []Correspondence: Shuchun Yu, Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi, PR China (e-mail: yscdoc11@ 123456sina.com ).
                Article
                MD-D-19-02633 18448
                10.1097/MD.0000000000018448
                6946210
                31876726
                Copyright © 2019 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

                Product
                Categories
                3300
                Research Article
                Clinical Trial/Experimental Study
                Custom metadata
                TRUE

                Comments

                Comment on this article