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      Feminism Between the Sheets: Sexual Attitudes Among Feminists, Nonfeminists, and Egalitarians

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      Psychology of Women Quarterly
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references20

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          Gender differences in sexuality: a meta-analysis.

          This meta-analysis surveyed 177 usable sources that reported data on gender differences on 21 different measures of sexual attitudes and behaviors. The largest gender difference was in incidence of masturbation: Men had the greater incidence (d = .96). There was also a large gender difference in attitudes toward casual sex: Males had considerably more permissive attitudes (d = .81). There were no gender differences in attitudes toward homosexuality or in sexual satisfaction. Most other gender differences were in the small-to-moderate range. Gender differences narrowed from the 1960s to the 1980s for many variables. Chodorow's neoanalytic theory, sociobiology, social learning theory, social role theory, and script theory are discussed in relation to these findings.
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            Development and validation of a condom self-efficacy scale for college students.

            This study proposed to develop and validate a scale for the college population that measures self-efficacy in using condoms. The Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) was derived from several sources and consisted of 28 items describing an individual's feelings of confidence about being able to purchase condoms, put them on and take them off, and negotiate their use with a new sexual partner. This scale was administered to a sample of 768 college students. It was found to possess adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .91; test-retest correlation = .81) and correlated well with the Attitude Toward the Condom Scale (r = .51) and the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale for women (r = .55). Our scale also correlated with a measure of intention to use condoms (r = .40) but was unrelated to a measure of social desirability. Students who differed on measures of previous condom use as well as on sexual intercourse experience also showed significant differences on this scale in the expected direction, indicating evidence of this scale's discriminant validity. The potential uses of this scale in a college population are discussed, along with the issues underlying condom usage self-efficacy.
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              The sexuality scale: An instrument to measure sexual‐esteem, sexual‐depression, and sexual‐preoccupation

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psychology of Women Quarterly
                Psychology of Women Quarterly
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0361-6843
                1471-6402
                November 25 2016
                November 25 2016
                : 31
                : 2
                : 157-163
                Article
                10.1111/j.1471-6402.2007.00349.x
                8523d530-e5ee-4dfc-ac52-1d3aea09754b
                © 2016

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license


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