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      Social Boundaries of Appropriate Speech in HCI: A Politeness Perspective

      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Politeness, appropriateness, identity, speech, voice user interface

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          Abstract

          This position paper presents the view that there may be social boundaries in appropriate speech in HCI. While previous research has examined that humanlike voices may not always be appropriate for computers to use, the same may hold true for linguistic concepts that have noticeable interpersonal and social functions. This paper examines the social functions of linguistic politeness to approach the issue of appropriate language use in spoken HCI, and the relationship between voices and language in this interaction space. Several studies exploring politeness in spoken HCI are discussed, with the view that it and other social talk may have different limitations in HCI, and that politeness itself may have to be subsequently reconsidered.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Politeness Theory and Relational Work

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            The politeness effect: Pedagogical agents and learning outcomes

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              The role of beliefs in lexical alignment: evidence from dialogs with humans and computers.

              Five experiments examined the extent to which speakers' alignment (i.e., convergence) on words in dialog is mediated by beliefs about their interlocutor. To do this, we told participants that they were interacting with another person or a computer in a task in which they alternated between selecting pictures that matched their 'partner's' descriptions and naming pictures themselves (though in reality all responses were scripted). In both text- and speech-based dialog, participants tended to repeat their partner's choice of referring expression. However, they showed a stronger tendency to align with 'computer' than with 'human' partners, and with computers that were presented as less capable than with computers that were presented as more capable. The tendency to align therefore appears to be mediated by beliefs, with the relevant beliefs relating to an interlocutor's perceived communicative capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-5
                Affiliations
                University College Dublin

                School of Information & Communication Studies, Dublin, Ireland
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.76
                © Clark. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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