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Golgi-associated RhoBTB3 targets Cyclin E for ubiquitylation and promotes cell cycle progression

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The Journal of Cell Biology

The Rockefeller University Press

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      Abstract

      The Golgi protein RhoBTB3 in complex with CUL3 and RBX1 promotes Cyclin E ubiquitylation to allow its turnover during S phase and progression through the cell cycle.

      Abstract

      Cyclin E regulates the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase and is degraded before entry into G2 phase. Here we show that RhoBTB3, a Golgi-associated, Rho-related ATPase, regulates the S/G2 transition of the cell cycle by targeting Cyclin E for ubiquitylation. Depletion of RhoBTB3 arrested cells in S phase, triggered Golgi fragmentation, and elevated Cyclin E levels. On the Golgi, RhoBTB3 bound Cyclin E as part of a Cullin3 (CUL3)-dependent RING–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex comprised of RhoBTB3, CUL3, and RBX1. Golgi association of this complex was required for its ability to catalyze Cyclin E ubiquitylation and allow normal cell cycle progression. These experiments reveal a novel role for a Ras superfamily member in catalyzing Cyclin E turnover during S phase, as well as an unexpected, essential role for the Golgi as a ubiquitylation platform for cell cycle control.

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      Approximately one percent of the human genome encodes proteins that either regulate or are regulated by direct interaction with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. Through a series of complex biochemical networks, these highly conserved molecular switches control some of the most fundamental processes of cell biology common to all eukaryotes, including morphogenesis, polarity, movement, and cell division. In the first part of this review, we present the best characterized of these biochemical pathways; in the second part, we attempt to integrate these molecular details into a biological context.
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        Cullin-RING complexes comprise the largest known class of ubiquitin ligases. Owing to the great diversity of their substrate-receptor subunits, it is possible that there are hundreds of distinct cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases in eukaryotic cells, which establishes these enzymes as key mediators of post-translational protein regulation. In this review, we focus on the composition, regulation and function of cullin-RING ligases, and describe how these enzymes can be characterized by a set of general principles.
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          From the pioneering work with acute transforming retroviruses to the current post-genomic era, RAS genes have always been at the leading edge of signal transduction and molecular oncology. Yet, a complete understanding of RAS function and dysfunction - mainly in human cancer - is still to come. The knowledge that has accumulated since their discovery 30 years ago has, however, been remarkable, and should pave the way for not only solving the outstanding issues regarding RAS biology, but also for developing efficacious drugs that could have a significant impact on cancer treatment.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305
            Author notes
            Correspondence to Albert Lu: alulopez@ 123456stanford.edu ; or Suzanne R. Pfeffer: pfeffer@ 123456stanford.edu
            Journal
            J Cell Biol
            J. Cell Biol
            jcb
            The Journal of Cell Biology
            The Rockefeller University Press
            0021-9525
            1540-8140
            28 October 2013
            : 203
            : 2
            : 233-250
            24145166
            3812982
            201305158
            10.1083/jcb.201305158
            © 2013 Lu and Pfeffer

            This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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