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      The Effects of Chinese Seafarers’ Job Demands on Turnover Intention: The Role of Fun at Work

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          Abstract

          This study examines how an occupational commitment and a fun work environment serve as important mechanisms that influence the job demands–turnover intentions relationship. On the basis of the job demands–resources model, the study explored the relationship between job demands, occupational commitment, fun at work, and turnover intention. The hypotheses were (1) that job demands would be positively associated with predicted turnover intention; (2) that occupational commitment would mediate the job demands–turnover intention link and (3) that a fun environment would moderate the relationship between job demands and occupational commitment and between job demands and turnover intention. The study sampled 294 seafarers using an online survey, and applied descriptive, correlative analysis and the PROCESS Macro to test the hypotheses. Findings provide preliminary support for the three hypotheses, and contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism determining seafarers’ turnover intention. The results suggest the importance of holding appropriate group activities on-board to help seafarers alleviate fatigue and stress.

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          Most cited references 58

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          Teacher Turnover and Teacher Shortages: An Organizational Analysis

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            Dual processes at work in a call centre: An application of the job demands – resources model

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              A meta-analytic review of occupational commitment: relations with person- and work-related variables.

              Relations between occupational commitment (OC) and several person- and work-related variables were examined meta-analytically (76 samples; across analyses, Ns ranged 746-15,774). Major findings are as follows. First, OC was positively related to job-focused constructs such as job involvement and satisfaction, suggesting that attitudes toward the job itself may be a central concern in committing to one's occupation. Second, consistent with previous work, OC and organizational commitment were positively related. This relation was found to be moderated by the compatibility of the profession and the employing organization. Third, OC was positively related to job performance and had an indirect effect on organizational turnover intention through occupational turnover intention. This latter effect suggests that understanding of organizational turnover can be enhanced by incorporating occupation-related variables into turnover models.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                ijerph
                International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
                MDPI
                1661-7827
                1660-4601
                21 July 2020
                July 2020
                : 17
                : 14
                Affiliations
                [1 ]College of Public Administration and Humanities, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026, China; guyuan@ 123456dlmu.edu.cn (Y.G.); liudongbei@ 123456dlmu.edu.cn (D.L.); davidyang@ 123456dlmu.edu.cn (C.Y.); dongzhen@ 123456dlmu.edu.cn (Z.D.)
                [2 ]Navigation College, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026, China; captainzheng@ 123456dlmu.edu.cn
                [3 ]Department of Psychology, HELP University, Shah Alam 40150, Malaysia
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: teeyj@ 123456help.edu.my
                Article
                ijerph-17-05247
                10.3390/ijerph17145247
                7399984
                32708123
                © 2020 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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