Blog
About

10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      UV-blue structural coloration and competition for nestboxes in male eastern bluebirds

      ,

      Animal Behaviour

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Armaments and ornaments: an evolutionary explanation of traits of dual utility

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Sexual selection unhandicapped by the Fisher process.

             Alan Grafen (1990)
            A population genetic model of sexual selection is constructed in which, at equilibrium, males signal their quality by developing costly ornaments, and females pay costs to use the ornaments in mate choice. It is shown that the form of the equilibrium is uninfluenced by the Fisher process, that is, by self-reinforcement of female preferences. This is a working model of the handicap principle applied to sexual selection, and places Zahavi's handicap principle on the same logical footing as the Fisher process, in that each can support sexual selection without the presence of the other. A way of measuring the relative importance of the two processes is suggested that can be applied to both theories and facts. A style of modelling that allows simple genetics and complicated biology to be combined is recommended.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Should females prefer dominant males?

              It is generally believed that success in male-male competition genuinely reflects high quality and that female preference for dominant males should therefore be widespread. However, recent studies suggest that male dominance is not always attractive and that it does not necessarily predict superior parental quality, better genes or other forms of benefit to females. In fact, the costs of choosing a dominant male can sometimes outweigh the benefits. When traits selected by male-male competition do not reflect overall mate quality, females are expected to use other choice cues and might occasionally prefer subordinate males. Thus, male-male competition and female choice can sometimes work in different, or even opposing, directions.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Animal Behaviour
                Animal Behaviour
                Elsevier BV
                00033472
                January 2005
                January 2005
                : 69
                : 1
                : 67-72
                Article
                10.1016/j.anbehav.2003.12.026
                © 2005

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

                Comments

                Comment on this article