Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Spin transport in graphene/transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures

Preprint

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Since its discovery, graphene has been a promising material for spintronics: its low spin-orbit coupling, negligible hyperfine interaction, and high electron mobility are obvious advantages for transporting spin information over long distances. However, such outstanding transport properties also limit the capability to engineer active spintronics, where strong spin-orbit coupling is crucial for creating and manipulating spin currents. To this end, transition metal dichalcogenides, which have larger spin-orbit coupling and good interface matching, appear to be highly complementary materials for enhancing the spin-dependent features of graphene while maintaining its superior charge transport properties. In this review, we present the theoretical framework and the experiments performed to detect and characterize the spin-orbit coupling and spin currents in graphene/transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures. Specifically, we will concentrate on recent measurements of Hanle precession, weak antilocalization and the spin Hall effect, and provide a comprehensive theoretical description of the interconnection between these phenomena.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 67

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Statistical-Mechanical Theory of Irreversible Processes. I. General Theory and Simple Applications to Magnetic and Conduction Problems

       Ryogo Kubo (1957)
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: found
        Is Open Access

        Van der Waals heterostructures

        Research on graphene and other two-dimensional atomic crystals is intense and likely to remain one of the hottest topics in condensed matter physics and materials science for many years. Looking beyond this field, isolated atomic planes can also be reassembled into designer heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. The first - already remarkably complex - such heterostructures (referred to as 'van der Waals') have recently been fabricated and investigated revealing unusual properties and new phenomena. Here we review this emerging research area and attempt to identify future directions. With steady improvement in fabrication techniques, van der Waals heterostructures promise a new gold rush, rather than a graphene aftershock.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Ultrahigh electron mobility in suspended graphene

          We have achieved mobilities in excess of 200,000 cm^2/Vs at electron densities of ~2*10^11 cm^-2 by suspending single layer graphene. Suspension ~150 nm above a Si/SiO_2 gate electrode and electrical contacts to the graphene was achieved by a combination of electron beam lithography and etching. The specimens were cleaned in situ by employing current-induced heating, directly resulting in a significant improvement of electrical transport. Concomitant with large mobility enhancement, the widths of the characteristic Dirac peaks are reduced by a factor of 10 compared to traditional, non-suspended devices. This advance should allow for accessing the intrinsic transport properties of graphene.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            26 April 2018
            1804.10000 10.1039/C7CS00864C

            http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

            Custom metadata
            Chemical Society Review, 2018
            21 pages, 11 figures. This document is the unedited Author's version of a Submitted Work that was subsequently accepted for publication in Nano Letters, copyright\c{opyright}American Chemical Society after peer review. To access the final edited and published work see http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2018/CS/C7CS00864C
            cond-mat.mes-hall

            Nanophysics

            Comments

            Comment on this article