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      Up-regulation of collagen proteins in colorectal liver metastasis compared with normal liver tissue

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          Most cited references 29

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          How matrix metalloproteinases regulate cell behavior.

          The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a multigene family of over 25 secreted and cell surface enzymes that process or degrade numerous pericellular substrates. Their targets include other proteinases, proteinase inhibitors, clotting factors, chemotactic molecules, latent growth factors, growth factor-binding proteins, cell surface receptors, cell-cell adhesion molecules, and virtually all structural extracellular matrix proteins. Thus MMPs are able to regulate many biologic processes and are closely regulated themselves. We review recent advances that help to explain how MMPs work, how they are controlled, and how they influence biologic behavior. These advances shed light on how the structure and function of the MMPs are related and on how their transcription, secretion, activation, inhibition, localization, and clearance are controlled. MMPs participate in numerous normal and abnormal processes, and there are new insights into the key substrates and mechanisms responsible for regulating some of these processes in vivo. Our knowledge in the field of MMP biology is rapidly expanding, yet we still do not fully understand how these enzymes regulate most processes of development, homeostasis, and disease.
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            Why don't we get more cancer? A proposed role of the microenvironment in restraining cancer progression.

            Tumors are like new organs and are made of multiple cell types and components. The tumor competes with the normal microenvironment to overcome antitumorigenic pressures. Before that battle is won, the tumor may exist within the organ unnoticed by the host, referred to as 'occult cancer'. We review how normal tissue homeostasis and architecture inhibit progression of cancer and how changes in the microenvironment can shift the balance of these signals to the procancerous state. We also include a discussion of how this information is being tailored for clinical use.
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              Trypsin cleaves exclusively C-terminal to arginine and lysine residues.

              Almost all large-scale projects in mass spectrometry-based proteomics use trypsin to convert protein mixtures into more readily analyzable peptide populations. When searching peptide fragmentation spectra against sequence databases, potentially matching peptide sequences can be required to conform to tryptic specificity, namely, cleavage exclusively C-terminal to arginine or lysine. In many published reports, however, significant numbers of proteins are identified by non-tryptic peptides. Here we use the sub-parts per million mass accuracy of a new ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer to achieve more than a 100-fold increased confidence in peptide identification compared with typical ion trap experiments and show that trypsin cleaves solely C-terminal to arginine and lysine. We find that non-tryptic peptides occur only as the C-terminal peptides of proteins and as breakup products of fully tryptic peptides N-terminal to an internal proline. Simulating lower mass accuracy led to a large number of proteins erroneously identified with non-tryptic peptide hits. Our results indicate that such peptide hits in previous studies should be re-examined and that peptide identification should be based on strict trypsin specificity.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Biological Chemistry
                J. Biol. Chem.
                American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
                0021-9258
                1083-351X
                January 04 2019
                January 04 2019
                January 04 2019
                November 08 2018
                : 294
                : 1
                : 281-289
                Article
                10.1074/jbc.RA118.005087
                © 2018

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