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      Association of Clinician Denial of Patient Requests With Patient Satisfaction

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          Abstract

          <div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-1"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e327">Question</h5> <p id="d1754092e329">How is denial of specific types of patient requests during office visits associated with patient satisfaction with the clinician? </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-2"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e332">Findings</h5> <p id="d1754092e334">This was a cross-sectional study of 1141 adults making 1319 office visits to 56 family physicians. Compared with fulfillment of the respective request type, denials of requests for referral, pain medication, other new medication, and laboratory tests were associated with worse patient satisfaction with the clinician. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-3"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e337">Meaning</h5> <p id="d1754092e339">Denial of some types of requests was associated with worse patient satisfaction with the clinician, but not for others, when compared with fulfillment of the requests, suggesting the need for clinician training in request handling. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-4"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e343">Importance</h5> <p id="d1754092e345">Prior studies suggesting clinician fulfillment or denial of requests affects patient satisfaction included limited adjustment for patient confounders. The studies also did not examine distinct request types, yet patient expectations and clinician fulfillment or denial might vary among request types. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-5"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e348">Objective</h5> <p id="d1754092e350">To examine how patient satisfaction with the clinician is associated with clinician denial of distinct types of patient requests, adjusting for patient characteristics. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-6"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e353">Design, Setting, and Participants</h5> <p id="d1754092e355">Cross-sectional observational study of 1319 outpatient visits to family physicians (n = 56) by 1141 adults at one Northern California academic health center. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-7"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e358">Main Outcomes and Measures</h5> <p id="d1754092e360">We used 6 Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Clinician and Group Adult Visit Survey items to measure patient satisfaction with the visit physician. Standardized items were averaged to form the satisfaction score (Cronbach α = 0.80), which was then percentile-transformed. Seven separate linear mixed-effects models examined the adjusted mean differences in patient satisfaction percentile associated with denial of each of the following requests (if present)—referral, pain medication, antibiotic, other new medication, laboratory test, radiology test, or other test—compared with fulfillment of the respective requests. The models adjusted for patient sociodemographics, weight, health status, personality, worry over health, prior visit with clinician, and the other 6 request categories and their dispositions. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-8"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e363">Results</h5> <p id="d1754092e365">The mean (SD) age of the 1141 patients was 45.6 (16.1) years, and 902 (68.4%) were female. Among 1319 visits, 897 (68.0%) included at least 1 request; 1441 (85.2%) were fulfilled. Requests by category were referral, 294 (21.1%); pain medication, 271 (20.5%); antibiotic, 107 (8.1%); other new medication, 271 (20.5%); laboratory test, 448 (34.0%); radiology test, 153 (11.6%); and other tests, 147 (11.1%). Compared with fulfillment of the respective request type, clinician denials of requests for referral, pain medication, other new medication, and laboratory test were associated with worse satisfaction (adjusted mean percentile differences, −19.75 [95% CI, −30.75 to −8.74], −10.72 [95% CI, −19.66 to −1.78], −20.36 [95% CI, −29.54 to −11.18], and −9.19 [95% CI, −17.50 to −0.87]), respectively. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="ab-ioi170108-9"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1754092e368">Conclusions and Relevance</h5> <p id="d1754092e370">Clinician denial of some types of requests was associated with worse patient satisfaction with the clinician, but not for others, when compared with fulfillment of the requests. In an era of patient satisfaction-driven compensation, the findings suggest the need to train clinicians to deal effectively with requests, potentially enhancing patient and clinician experiences. </p> </div><p class="first" id="d1754092e373">This cross-sectional observational study examines how patient satisfaction with the clinician is associated with clinician denial of distinct types of patient requests, adjusting for patient characteristics. </p>

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          JAMA Internal Medicine
          JAMA Intern Med
          American Medical Association (AMA)
          2168-6106
          January 01 2018
          January 01 2018
          : 178
          : 1
          : 85
          Article
          10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.6611
          5833505
          29181542
          85a79608-9286-40b6-b789-3da8af12833e
          © 2018
          History

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