121
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
5 collections
    2
    shares

      To submit to this journal, please click here

      Your research makes an impact. Our goal is to share all excellent science as broadly and effectively as possible to accelerate discovery and lead a transformation in research communication.

      Learn more and submit here

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Effect of climate change on cerebrospinal meningitis morbidities and mortalities: A longitudinal and community-based study in Ghana

      , ,
      PLOS Climate
      Public Library of Science (PLoS)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Cerebrospinal Meningitis (CSM) is one of the climate-sensitive diseases affected by global climate change. Its causal agent, Neisseria meningitidis bacterial, thrives well in warm environments. CSM epidemics are likely to be exacerbated by the warming globe emanating from climate change. Yet studies have rarely examined the association between climat’e change and CSM. Moreover, studies drawing on quantitative and qualitative data to understand the pathways of climate change domains and CSM relationships as well as community perspectives of CSM are rare. This study deployed mixed-method research to analyse community perceptions of and the relationship between climate change and CSM. We collected 96 months of data on changes in metrological weather parameters (temperatures, sunshine, relative and absolute humidity, and rainfall) and CSM cases and mortalities recorded between 2012 and 2019. Community-level data were elicited using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between climate variables and CSM. High temperatures and sunshine, low rainfall, low relative and absolute humidity were significantly associated with CSM outbreaks. Community participants demonstrated fair knowledge about CSM and attributed its outbreak to climate change. The respondents asserted that the symptoms of CSM, such as severe headache, high fever, stiff neck and waist pains, among others, are often prevalent in their communities when there is high temperature, low relative and absolute humidity, excessive sunshine and dusty winds (harmattan winds). They also revealed that poor environmental sanitation, poor room ventilation, overcrowding in a room, and social integration such as festivals, markets, and religious activities, among others, can exacerbate the outbreak of CSM. We recommend awareness campaign in the communities on the need to ensure proper ventilation in their homes and workplaces, keep their surroundings clean and preserve the econ-system to reduce high temperatures.

          Related collections

          Most cited references30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found

          The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: from 25 years of inaction to a global transformation for public health

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Understanding and managing connected extreme events

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt.

              In the African meningitis belt, epidemics of meningococcal disease occur periodically, although unpredictably, every few years. These epidemics continue to cause havoc but new efforts to control the disease, through the use of conjugate vaccines, are being made. Conjugate vaccines are likely to reduce meningococcal carriage, thus generating herd immunity, but to understand their potential impact we need to know more about the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in Africa. We review published studies of meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt. A wide range of carriage prevalences has been reported, from 3% to over 30%, and the serogroup distribution has been variable. Factors influencing carriage include age, contact with a case, and the epidemic/endemic situation; however, season and immunisation with polysaccharide vaccine have little effect. Since the dynamics of carriage within a population are complex, longitudinal carriage studies are of great value; however, few such studies have been done. Carefully designed carriage studies are needed to measure and interpret the impact of meningococcal group A conjugate vaccines in Africa.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                PLOS Climate
                PLOS Clim
                Public Library of Science (PLoS)
                2767-3200
                August 15 2022
                August 15 2022
                : 1
                : 8
                : e0000067
                Article
                10.1371/journal.pclm.0000067
                85e7feb7-f3ef-4c16-93f0-b3b64414bc85
                © 2022

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Environmental change,Public health
                Environmental change, Public health

                Comments

                Comment on this article