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      Late bilinguals see a scan in scanner AND in scandal: dissecting formal overlap from morphological priming in the processing of derived words

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      Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          Masked priming research with late (non-native) bilinguals has reported facilitation effects following morphologically derived prime words (scanner – scan). However, unlike for native speakers, there are suggestions that purely orthographic prime-target overlap (scandal – scan) also produces priming in non-native visual word recognition. Our study directly compares orthographically related and derived prime-target pairs. While native readers showed morphological but not formal overlap priming, the two prime types yielded the same magnitudes of facilitation for non-natives. We argue that early word recognition processes in a non-native language are more influenced by surface-form properties than in one's native language.

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          Fast morphological effects in first and second language word recognition

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            Morphological facilitation for regular and irregular verb formations in native and non-native speakers: Little evidence for two distinct mechanisms.

            The authors compared performance on two variants of the primed lexical decision task to investigate morphological processing in native and non-native speakers of English. They examined patterns of facilitation on present tense targets. Primes were regular (billed-bill) past tense formations and two types of irregular past tense forms that varied on preservation of target length (fell-fall; taught-teach). When a forward mask preceded the prime (Exp. 1), language and prime type interacted. Native speakers showed reliable regular and irregular length preserved facilitation relative to orthographic controls. Non-native speakers' latencies after morphological and orthographic primes did not differ reliably except for regulars. Under cross-modal conditions (Exp. 2), language and prime type interacted. Native but not non-native speakers showed inhibition following orthographically similar primes. Collectively, reliable facilitation for regulars and patterns across verb type and task provided little support for a processing dichotomy (decomposition, non-combinatorial association) based on inflectional regularity in either native or non-native speakers of English.
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              Inflection and derivation in native and non-native language processing: Masked priming experiments on Turkish

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
                Bilingualism
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                1366-7289
                1469-1841
                July 2015
                November 2014
                : 18
                : 03
                : 543-550
                Article
                10.1017/S1366728914000662
                865aa50a-0c76-4159-8b74-7e50d7937880
                © 2015
                History

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