24
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Black and Belonging at School: A Case for Interpersonal, Instructional, and Institutional Opportunity Structures

      1 , 2 , 3
      Educational Psychologist
      Informa UK Limited

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references100

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Social stigma and self-esteem: The self-protective properties of stigma.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A brief social-belonging intervention improves academic and health outcomes of minority students.

            A brief intervention aimed at buttressing college freshmen's sense of social belonging in school was tested in a randomized controlled trial (N = 92), and its academic and health-related consequences over 3 years are reported. The intervention aimed to lessen psychological perceptions of threat on campus by framing social adversity as common and transient. It used subtle attitude-change strategies to lead participants to self-generate the intervention message. The intervention was expected to be particularly beneficial to African-American students (N = 49), a stereotyped and socially marginalized group in academics, and less so to European-American students (N = 43). Consistent with these expectations, over the 3-year observation period the intervention raised African Americans' grade-point average (GPA) relative to multiple control groups and halved the minority achievement gap. This performance boost was mediated by the effect of the intervention on subjective construal: It prevented students from seeing adversity on campus as an indictment of their belonging. Additionally, the intervention improved African Americans' self-reported health and well-being and reduced their reported number of doctor visits 3 years postintervention. Senior-year surveys indicated no awareness among participants of the intervention's impact. The results suggest that social belonging is a psychological lever where targeted intervention can have broad consequences that lessen inequalities in achievement and health.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A question of belonging: race, social fit, and achievement.

              Stigmatization can give rise to belonging uncertainty. In this state, people are sensitive to information diagnostic of the quality of their social connections. Two experiments tested how belonging uncertainty undermines the motivation and achievement of people whose group is negatively characterized in academic settings. In Experiment 1, students were led to believe that they might have few friends in an intellectual domain. Whereas White students were unaffected, Black students (stigmatized in academics) displayed a drop in their sense of belonging and potential. In Experiment 2, an intervention that mitigated doubts about social belonging in college raised the academic achievement (e.g., college grades) of Black students but not of White students. Implications for theories of achievement motivation and intervention are discussed. 2007 APA, all rights reserved
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Educational Psychologist
                Educational Psychologist
                Informa UK Limited
                0046-1520
                1532-6985
                March 13 2018
                April 03 2018
                February 08 2018
                April 03 2018
                : 53
                : 2
                : 97-113
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Teacher Education and Learning Sciences, North Carolina State University
                [2 ] Department of Psychology, North Carolina State University
                [3 ] Department of Educational Foundations, Montclair State University
                Article
                10.1080/00461520.2017.1421466
                865d8f96-809b-4f45-8af6-f97666b2a492
                © 2018
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article