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      The Greek-Orthodox version of the Brief Religious Coping (B-RCOPE) instrument: psychometric properties in three samples and associations with mental disorders, suicidality, illness perceptions, and quality of life

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          Abstract

          Background

          The B-RCOPE is a brief measure assessing religious coping. We aimed to assess the psychometric properties of its Greek version in people with and without long-term conditions (LTCs). Associations between religious coping and mental illness, suicidality, illness perceptions, and quality of life were also investigated.

          Methods

          The B-RCOPE was administered to 351 patients with diabetes, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD), and rheumatic diseases attending either the emergency department ( N = 74) or specialty clinics ( N = 302) and 127 people without LTCs. Diagnosis of mental disorders was established by the MINI. Associations with depressive symptom severity (PHQ-9), suicidal risk (RASS), illness perceptions (B-IPQ), and health-related quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) were also investigated.

          Results

          The Greek version of B-RCOPE showed a coherent two-dimensional factor structure with remarkable stability across the three samples corresponding to the positive (PRC) and negative (NRC) religious coping dimensions. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.91–0.96 and 0.77–0.92 for the PRC and NRC dimensions, respectively. Furthermore, NRC was associated with poorer mental health, greater depressive symptom severity and suicidality, and impaired HRQoL. In patients with LTCs, PRC correlated with lower perceived illness timeline, while NRC was associated with greater perceived illness consequences, lower perceived treatment control, greater illness concern, and lower illness comprehensibility.

          Conclusions

          These findings indicate that the Greek-Orthodox B-RCOPE version may reliably assess religious coping. In addition, negative religious coping (i.e., religious struggle) is associated with adverse illness perceptions, and thus may detrimentally impact adaptation to medical illness. These findings deserve replication in prospective studies.

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          Most cited references38

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          Practical statistics for medical researched

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            The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL): A Five-Item Measure for Use in Epidemological Studies

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              A comparison of some methodologies for the factor analysis of non-normal Likert variables: A note on the size of the model

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                vanessapaika@yahoo.gr
                andreli@med.auth.gr
                elizapsi21@yahoo.gr
                mikadelta@gmail.com
                konkotsis@gmail.com
                vsiafaka@gmail.com
                kostasfountoulakis@gmail.com
                kpargam@bgsu.edu
                andrefc7@terra.com.br
                +30 26510 07322 , tyfantis@cc.uoi.gr , thomashyphantis@outlook.com
                Journal
                Ann Gen Psychiatry
                Ann Gen Psychiatry
                Annals of General Psychiatry
                BioMed Central (London )
                1744-859X
                16 February 2017
                16 February 2017
                2017
                : 16
                : 13
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2108 7481, GRID grid.9594.1, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, , University of Ioannina, ; 45110 Ioannina, Greece
                [2 ]ISNI 0000000109457005, GRID grid.4793.9, Third Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, , Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, ; Thessaloniki, Greece
                [3 ]GRID grid.466172.0, Department of Speech and Language Therapy, , Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, ; Ioannina, Greece
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0661 0035, GRID grid.253248.a, Department of Psychology, , Bowling Green State University, ; Bowling Green, OH USA
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2160 0329, GRID grid.8395.7, Department of Clinical Medicine and Translational Psychiatry Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, , Federal University of Ceará, ; Fortaleza, CE Brazil
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7647-4312
                Article
                136
                10.1186/s12991-017-0136-4
                5314716
                865ddc33-21a5-43e8-85b3-53a3ca5b1013
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                History
                : 7 December 2016
                : 11 February 2017
                Funding
                Funded by: European Economic Area (EEA) Financial Mechanism 2009-2014
                Award ID: EEA GR07/3767
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Primary Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry
                religious coping,religiousness,mental disorder,depression,anxiety,suicidal risk,illness perceptions,quality of life,psychometric properties,chronic illness

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