15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part III: behavioural and psychosocial interventions.

      European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

      therapy, Europe, Humans, Tic Disorders, Tourette Syndrome, Behavior Therapy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This clinical guideline provides recommendations for the behavioural and psychosocial interventions (BPI) of children and adolescents with tic disorders prepared by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS). A systematic literature search was conducted to obtain an update on the efficacy of BPI for tics. Relevant studies were identified using computerised searches of the Medline and PsycINFO databases and the Cochrane Library for the years 1950-2010. The search identified no meta-analyses, yet twelve (systematic) reviews and eight randomised controlled trials provided evidence for the current review. Most evidence was found for habit reversal training (HRT) and the available but smaller evidence also supports the efficacy of exposure with response prevention (ERP). Both interventions are considered first line behavioural treatments for tics for both children and adults and should be offered to a patient, taking into account his preference. Treatments that are considered second line or add-on behavioural treatments are contingency management, function based interventions and relaxation training. Neurofeedback is still experimental. Almost no research was identified that examined the efficacy of psychosocial interventions, e.g., psychoeducation and group work. Based on clinical practice, this guideline recommends behavioural treatment as first line offer to patients in most cases. It should be embedded within a psychoeducational and supportive context and can be combined with drug treatment.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          10.1007/s00787-011-0167-3
          21445725

          Chemistry

          therapy, Europe, Humans, Tic Disorders, Tourette Syndrome, Behavior Therapy

          Comments

          Comment on this article