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      Morphological Awareness, Orthographic Knowledge, and Spelling Errors: Keys to Understanding Early Chinese Literacy Acquisition

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      Scientific Studies of Reading
      Informa UK Limited

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          Contributions of Morphology Beyond Phonology to Literacy Outcomes of Upper Elementary and Middle-School Students.

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            Morphological Awareness Uniquely Predicts Young Children's Chinese Character Recognition.

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              The role of phonological awareness and visual-orthographic skills in Chinese reading acquisition.

              This study examined the role of phonological awareness and visual-orthographic skills in Chinese reading acquisition. The subjects were 154 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 5th graders in Beijing who had learned an alphabetic script known as Hanyu Pinyin to help read Chinese characters. Children's performance on tests of various cognitive skills, reading ability, and pinyin knowledge were examined. Results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that (a) visual skills predicted reading success at lower grades; (b) pinyin knowledge and the ability to discriminate homophonic characters predicted reading success in Grades 2, 3, and 5; and (c) onset-rime awareness, but not phonemic awareness, predicted Chinese reading. This suggests that learning to read Chinese progresses from a logographic phase to an orthographic-phonological phase and that the nature of phonological awareness predicting reading success is contingent on the characteristics of the writing system.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Scientific Studies of Reading
                Scientific Studies of Reading
                Informa UK Limited
                1088-8438
                1532-799X
                September 18 2009
                September 18 2009
                : 13
                : 5
                : 426-452
                Article
                10.1080/10888430903162910
                869d7712-f4f7-4fb1-8f76-8d51bbbedfa8
                © 2009
                History

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