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      Remotely sensed measures of Hurricane Michael damage and adverse perinatal outcomes and access to prenatal care services in the Florida panhandle

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          Abstract

          Background

          Studies of effects of hurricanes on perinatal outcomes often rely on approximate measures of exposure. This study aims to use observed damage from aerial imagery to refine residential building damage estimates, evaluate the population changes post landfall, and assess the associations between the extent of residential building damage and adverse perinatal outcomes and access to prenatal care (PNC) services. 

          Methods

          Vital statistics data from the Florida Department of Health’s Office of Vital Statistics were used to align maternal geocoded address data to high-resolution imagery (0.5-foot resolution, true color with red, blue, and green bands) aerial photographs. Machine learning (support vector machines) classified residential roof damage across the study area. Perinatal outcomes were compared with the presence or absence of damage to the mother’s home. Log-binomial regression models were used to compare the populations living in and outside of high-risk/damage areas, to assess the population changes after Hurricane Michael, and to estimate the associations between damage after Hurricane Michael and adverse perinatal outcomes/access to PNC services. A semi-parametric linear model was used to model time of first PNC visit and increase in damage.

          Results

          We included 8,965 women in analysis. Women with lower education and/or of Black or other non-White race/ethnicity were more likely to live in areas that would see high damage than other groups. Moreover, there was a greater proportion of births delivered by women living in the high-risk/damage area (> 25% damaged parcels after Michael) in the year before Michael than the year after Michael. Lastly, living in the area with relatively high damage increased the risk of having intermediate or inadequate PNC (adjusted Risk Ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.43), but not other adverse perinatal outcomes.

          Conclusions

          Aerially observed damage data enable us to evaluate the impact of natural disasters on perinatal outcomes and access to PNC services based on residential building damage immediately surrounding a household. The association between the extent of damage and adverse perinatal outcomes should be further investigated in future studies.

          Supplementary Information

          The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1186/s12940-022-00924-1.

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          Most cited references24

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          Scikit-learn machine learning in Python

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            Race, class, and Hurricane Katrina: Social differences in human responses to disaster

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              The Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index: its US distribution and association with low birthweight.

              The proposed Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index is applied to data from the 1980 National Natality Survey to assess the adequacy of prenatal care utilization and its association with low birthweight in the United States. The index suggests that only 61.1% of women received adequate prenatal care, including 17.7% with more intensive care; 16.7% received inadequate care. More White women (63.4%) than Black women (51.9%) received adequate prenatal care. Low-birthweight rates were elevated among women with inadequate prenatal care and among those who received more intensive prenatal care.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                kpan@tulane.edu
                edg17@fsu.edu
                cuejio@fsu.edu
                les.beitsch@med.fsu.edu
                samendra.sherchan@morgan.edu
                mlichtve@pitt.edu
                eharvill@tulane.edu
                Journal
                Environ Health
                Environ Health
                Environmental Health
                BioMed Central (London )
                1476-069X
                29 November 2022
                29 November 2022
                2022
                : 21
                : 118
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.265219.b, ISNI 0000 0001 2217 8588, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, , Tulane University, ; Tidewater 1820, 1440 Canal St, New Orleans, LA 70112 USA
                [2 ]GRID grid.255986.5, ISNI 0000 0004 0472 0419, Department of Geography, College of Social Sciences and Public Policy, , Florida State University, ; Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA
                [3 ]GRID grid.255986.5, ISNI 0000 0004 0472 0419, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, College of Medicine, , Florida State University, ; Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA
                [4 ]GRID grid.260238.d, ISNI 0000 0001 2224 4258, Department of Biology, , Morgan State University, ; Baltimore, MD 21251 USA
                [5 ]GRID grid.21925.3d, ISNI 0000 0004 1936 9000, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, , University of Pittsburgh, ; Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA
                Article
                924
                10.1186/s12940-022-00924-1
                9707262
                869fdab8-6e43-4ba0-b30d-494c83674a19
                © The Author(s) 2022

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

                History
                : 24 February 2022
                : 24 October 2022
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000066, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Award ID: R21ES031020
                Categories
                Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2022

                Public health
                disaster,hurricane,remote sensing,prenatal care,pregnancy,birth
                Public health
                disaster, hurricane, remote sensing, prenatal care, pregnancy, birth

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