Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Thioflavin T as an efficient fluorescence sensor for selective recognition of RNA G-quadruplexes

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          RNA G-quadruplexes (G4s) play important roles in translational regulation, mRNA processing events and gene expression. Therefore, a fluorescent probe that is capable of efficiently recognizing RNA G-quadruplex structures among other RNA forms is highly desirable. In this study, a water-soluble fluorogenic dye (i.e., Thioflavin T (ThT)) was employed to recognize RNA G-quadruplex structures using UV–Vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and emission lifetime experiments. By stacking on the G-tetrad, the ThT probe exhibited highly specific recognition of RNA G-quadruplex structures with striking fluorescence enhancement compared with other RNA forms. The specific binding demonstrates that ThT is an efficient fluorescence sensor that can distinguish G4 and non-G4 RNA structures.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Quantitative visualization of DNA G-quadruplex structures in human cells.

          Four-stranded G-quadruplex nucleic acid structures are of great interest as their high thermodynamic stability under near-physiological conditions suggests that they could form in cells. Here we report the generation and application of an engineered, structure-specific antibody employed to quantitatively visualize DNA G-quadruplex structures in human cells. We show explicitly that G-quadruplex formation in DNA is modulated during cell-cycle progression and that endogenous G-quadruplex DNA structures can be stabilized by a small-molecule ligand. Together these findings provide substantive evidence for the formation of G-quadruplex structures in the genome of mammalian cells and corroborate the application of stabilizing ligands in a cellular context to target G-quadruplexes and intervene with their function.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prevalence of quadruplexes in the human genome

            Guanine-rich DNA sequences of a particular form have the ability to fold into four-stranded structures called G-quadruplexes. In this paper, we present a working rule to predict which primary sequences can form this structure, and describe a search algorithm to identify such sequences in genomic DNA. We count the number of quadruplexes found in the human genome and compare that with the figure predicted by modelling DNA as a Bernoulli stream or as a Markov chain, using windows of various sizes. We demonstrate that the distribution of loop lengths is significantly different from what would be expected in a random case, providing an indication of the number of potentially relevant quadruplex-forming sequences. In particular, we show that there is a significant repression of quadruplexes in the coding strand of exonic regions, which suggests that quadruplex-forming patterns are disfavoured in sequences that will form RNA.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Crystal structure of parallel quadruplexes from human telomeric DNA.

              Telomeric ends of chromosomes, which comprise noncoding repeat sequences of guanine-rich DNA, are fundamental in protecting the cell from recombination and degradation. Disruption of telomere maintenance leads to eventual cell death, which can be exploited for therapeutic intervention in cancer. Telomeric DNA sequences can form four-stranded (quadruplex) structures, which may be involved in the structure of telomere ends. Here we describe the crystal structure of a quadruplex formed from four consecutive human telomeric DNA repeats and grown at a K(+) concentration that approximates its intracellular concentration. K(+) ions are observed in the structure. The folding and appearance of the DNA in this intramolecular quadruplex is fundamentally different from the published Na(+)-containing quadruplex structures. All four DNA strands are parallel, with the three linking trinucleotide loops positioned on the exterior of the quadruplex core, in a propeller-like arrangement. The adenine in each TTA linking trinucleotide loop is swung back so that it intercalates between the two thymines. This DNA structure suggests a straightforward path for telomere folding and unfolding, as well as ways in which it can recognize telomere-associated proteins.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group
                2045-2322
                21 April 2016
                2016
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ]National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Centre for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing, 100190, P. R. China
                [2 ]University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing, 100049, P. R. China
                Author notes
                Article
                srep24793
                10.1038/srep24793
                4838840
                27098781
                Copyright © 2016, Macmillan Publishers Limited

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Categories
                Article

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article