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      Dyadic coping, quality of life, and psychological distress among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and their partners

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          Abstract

          Background

          Successfully coping with a chronic disease depends significantly on social support, particularly that of a significant other. Thus, it depends on the ways of dealing with stress within a couple (dyadic coping). In this study, the relationship between dyadic coping and well-being was investigated among couples in which one partner suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

          Methods

          A total of 43 couples participated. They were mailed questionnaires on anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-BREF), and dyadic coping (Dyadic Coping Inventory).

          Results

          Low scores of positive and high scores of negative dyadic coping were associated with poorer quality of life and higher psychological distress among couples. Delegated coping (assistance with daily tasks) was higher among partners. When estimated by patients, high delegated partner coping (frequent provision of support by partners) and low delegated personal coping (low provision of support by patients) were associated with poorer quality of life for both patient and partner. COPD patients suffering from depression were supported more often and attributed deficits in dyadic coping primarily to themselves, whereas partners with higher scores of depression provided higher estimates of both their own negative coping and the negative coping of their partner.

          Conclusion

          The higher the patient perceived the imbalance in delegated dyadic coping, the lower the couple’s quality of life. More negative and less positive dyadic coping were associated with lower quality of life and higher psychological distress. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve dyadic coping may lead to better quality of life and less psychological distress among COPD patients and their partners.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
          International Journal of COPD
          International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
          Dove Medical Press
          1176-9106
          1178-2005
          2011
          2011
          16 November 2011
          : 6
          : 583-595
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
          [2 ]Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Caroline Meier, Consultation and Liaison Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich, Switzerland, Tel +41 44 255 9700, Fax +41 44 255 9701, Email caro2579@ 123456yahoo.com
          Article
          copd-6-583
          10.2147/COPD.S24508
          3224653
          22135491
          © 2011 Meier et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Categories
          Original Research

          Respiratory medicine

          anxiety, quality of life, partner study, copd, depression, dyadic coping

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