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      Subthalamic beta-targeted neurofeedback speeds up movement initiation but increases tremor in Parkinsonian patients

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          Abstract

          Previous studies have explored neurofeedback training for Parkinsonian patients to suppress beta oscillations in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, its impacts on movements and Parkinsonian tremor are unclear. We developed a neurofeedback paradigm targeting STN beta bursts and investigated whether neurofeedback training could improve motor initiation in Parkinson’s disease compared to passive observation. Our task additionally allowed us to test which endogenous changes in oscillatory STN activities are associated with trial-to-trial motor performance. Neurofeedback training reduced beta synchrony and increased gamma activity within the STN, and reduced beta band coupling between the STN and motor cortex. These changes were accompanied by reduced reaction times in subsequently cued movements. However, in Parkinsonian patients with pre-existing symptoms of tremor, successful volitional beta suppression was associated with an amplification of tremor which correlated with theta band activity in STN local field potentials, suggesting an additional cross-frequency interaction between STN beta and theta activities.

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          Most cited references 48

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          Asymptotic Theory of Certain "Goodness of Fit" Criteria Based on Stochastic Processes

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            Closed-loop brain training: the science of neurofeedback

            Neurofeedback is a psychophysiological procedure in which online feedback of neural activation is provided to the participant for the purpose of self-regulation. Learning control over specific neural substrates has been shown to change specific behaviours. As a progenitor of brain–machine interfaces, neurofeedback has provided a
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Reviewing Editor
                Role: Senior Editor
                Journal
                eLife
                Elife
                eLife
                eLife
                eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
                2050-084X
                18 November 2020
                2020
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ]MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit at the University of Oxford OxfordUnited Kingdom
                [2 ]Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford OxfordUnited Kingdom
                [3 ]Neurosciences Research Centre, Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George’s University of London LondonUnited Kingdom
                [4 ]Department of Neurology, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern BernSwitzerland
                [5 ]Department of Neurosurgery, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, King's Health Partners LondonUnited Kingdom
                [6 ]School of Automation Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology GuangzhouChina
                University of California, Berkeley United States
                University of California, Berkeley United States
                University of California, Berkeley United States
                University of Geneva Switzerland
                University of California, Berkeley United States
                Article
                60979
                10.7554/eLife.60979
                7695453
                33205752
                © 2020, He et al

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265, Medical Research Council;
                Award ID: MR/P012272/1
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265, Medical Research Council;
                Award ID: MC_UU_12024/1
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000272, National Institute for Health Research;
                Award ID: Oxford Biomedical Research Centre
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000833, Rosetrees Trust;
                Award Recipient :
                The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Neuroscience
                Custom metadata
                Patients with Parkinson's disease can be trained to self-suppress beta bursts in subthalamic nucleus, which was accompanied by quicker reaction times when prompted to move but increased tremor.

                Life sciences

                parkinson's disease, human, parkinsonian tremor, beta burst, neurofeedback, beta oscillations

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