12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Iterative evolution of hypercarnivory in canids (Mammalia: Carnivora): evolutionary interactions among sympatric predators

      Paleobiology
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Convergent evolution of hypercarnivorous adaptations in canids has occurred a number of times in the last 40 m.y. among distantly related taxa. The adaptations include an increase in carnassial blade length, reduction or loss of post-carnassial molars, and transformation of the talonid of the lower first molar from a basinlike depression into a trenchant, bladelike cusp. Although the diversity of these specialized canids is typically low in past and present communities, it was unusually high during the Late Oligocene of North America and the Pleistocene of South America. These two comparable events provide an opportunity for exploring possible causes of the evolution of hypercarnivory in canids. Plots of generic diversity against time for North American predators reveal a roughly inverse relationship between the number of hypercarnivorous canid taxa and the numbers of other hypercarnivores, such as creodonts, nimravids, mustelids, and amphicyonids. Similarly, the radiation of hypercarnivorous canids in South America occurred at a time of relatively low diversity of other hypercarnivores. Analysis of trophic diversity within the North American carnivore paleoguild before, during, and after the Late Oligocene reveals considerable taxonomic turnover among carnivores because of immigration and speciation. Late Oligocene hypercarnivorous canids appear to have been replaced first by amphicyonids and large mustelids, and then by felids.

          Related collections

          Most cited references36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          On the Ecological Significance of Bergmann's Rule

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Community Structure in Sympatric Carnivora

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Trophic diversity in past and present guilds of large predatory mammals

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                Paleobiology
                Paleobiology
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0094-8373
                1938-5331
                1991
                February 2016
                : 17
                : 04
                : 340-362
                Article
                10.1017/S0094837300010691
                8744cf03-4e6c-48fb-b8a9-0e8994bf2f72
                © 1991

                Comments

                Comment on this article