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      Glycosylation in cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

      1 , 2 , 3 ,   1 , 2 , 3 , 4
      Nature reviews. Cancer

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          Abstract

          Despite recent progress in understanding the cancer genome, there is still a relative delay in understanding the full aspects of the glycome and glycoproteome of cancer. Glycobiology has been instrumental in relevant discoveries in various biological and medical fields, and has contributed to the deciphering of several human diseases. Glycans are involved in fundamental molecular and cell biology processes occurring in cancer, such as cell signalling and communication, tumour cell dissociation and invasion, cell-matrix interactions, tumour angiogenesis, immune modulation and metastasis formation. The roles of glycans in cancer have been highlighted by the fact that alterations in glycosylation regulate the development and progression of cancer, serving as important biomarkers and providing a set of specific targets for therapeutic intervention. This Review discusses the role of glycans in fundamental mechanisms controlling cancer development and progression, and their applications in oncology.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nat. Rev. Cancer
          Nature reviews. Cancer
          1474-1768
          1474-175X
          Sep 2015
          : 15
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde (Institute for Research and Innovation in Health), University of Porto, Portugal.
          [2 ] Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto (IPATIMUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal.
          [3 ] Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS), University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n.228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal.
          [4 ] Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal.
          Article
          nrc3982
          10.1038/nrc3982
          26289314
          87be9b9a-6c21-46b9-852f-be18c543c3ad
          History

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