8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Incremental Health Care Costs Associated With Food Insecurity and Chronic Conditions Among Older Adults

      research-article

      , PhD , 1 , 2 , , PhD 3 , 4 , , DrPH 1

      Preventing Chronic Disease

      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Introduction

          The prevalence of food insecurity and chronic health conditions among older adults is a public health concern. However, little is known about associated health care costs. We estimated the incremental health care costs of food insecurity and selected chronic health conditions among older adults, defined as adults aged 50 or older.

          Methods

          We analyzed 4 years of data (2011–2014) from the National Health Interview Survey and 3 years of data (2013–2015) from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey; we used 2-part models to estimate the incremental health care costs associated with food insecurity and 9 chronic conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, emphysema, asthma, cancer, chronic bronchitis, arthritis, and diabetes) among older adults.

          Results

          Approximately 14% of older adult respondents (n = 2,150) reported being food insecure. The 3 most common chronic conditions were the same for both food-insecure and food-secure older adults: hypertension, arthritis, and diabetes. The adjusted annual incremental health care costs resulting from food insecurity among older adults were higher in the presence of hypertension, stroke, and arthritis ( P ≤ .05) and in the presence of diabetes ( P ≤ .10). These findings were also true for the incremental health care costs resulting from food insecurity in the absence of these specific chronic conditions.

          Conclusion

          Our findings show that food insecurity interacts with chronic conditions. We observed higher health care costs in the presence of this interaction for those who were food insecure and had poor health than for those who were food secure.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 13

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults: A 2012 Update

          The objective of this research was to update earlier estimates of prevalence rates of single chronic conditions and multiple (>2) chronic conditions (MCC) among the noninstitutionalized, civilian US adult population. Data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to generate estimates of MCC for US adults and by select demographic characteristics. Approximately half (117 million) of US adults have at least one of the 10 chronic conditions examined (ie, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, hepatitis, weak or failing kidneys, current asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Furthermore, 1 in 4 adults has MCC.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Association between household food insecurity and annual health care costs.

            Household food insecurity, a measure of income-related problems of food access, is growing in Canada and is tightly linked to poorer health status. We examined the association between household food insecurity status and annual health care costs.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Nutritional and health consequences are associated with food insecurity among U.S. elderly persons.

              The purpose of this study was to examine the consequences associated with food insecurity for the nutritional and health status of the elderly in the United STATES: The data analyzed were from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and the Nutrition Survey of the Elderly in New York State (1994). Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were used to assess the extent to which food-insecure elderly were likely to have lower nutrient intake, skinfold thickness, self-reported health status and higher nutritional risk. Regardless of food insecurity status, older people consumed less than the recommended dietary allowance for eight nutrients. Food-insecure elderly persons had significantly lower intakes of energy, protein, carbohydrate, saturated fat, niacin, riboflavin, vitamins B-6 and B-12, magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as lower skinfold thickness. In addition, food-insecure elderly persons were 2.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.73-3.14) times more likely to report fair/poor health status and had higher nutritional risk. These results indicate that food-insecure elderly persons have poorer dietary intake, nutritional status and health status than do food-secure elderly persons. It is necessary to ensure the nutritional well-being of all elderly persons who are at nutritional and health risk, including those who are food insecure and have even poorer nutritional and health status than those who are food secure.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Prev Chronic Dis
                Prev Chronic Dis
                PCD
                Preventing Chronic Disease
                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                1545-1151
                2018
                30 August 2018
                : 15
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Public Health Institute, Oakland, California
                [2 ]Inequality and Policy Research Center, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California
                [3 ]CDC Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia
                [4 ]Minga Analytics, LLC, Savannah, Georgia
                Author notes
                Corresponding Author: Sandra P. Garcia, PhD, Inequality and Policy Research Center, Claremont Graduate University, 150 E 10th St, Claremont, CA 91711. Telephone: 909-621-8000. Email: sandrag.phi@ 123456gmail.com .
                Article
                18_0058
                10.5888/pcd15.180058
                6130288
                30171678
                Categories
                Original Research
                Peer Reviewed

                Health & Social care

                Comments

                Comment on this article