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      A thematic analysis into the experiences of people with a mild intellectual disability during the COVID-19 lockdown period

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          Abstract

          Background. The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have a substantial impact on people with an intellectual disability. The goal of the current study was to explore the experiences and needs of people with a mild intellectual disability during the COVID-19 lockdown period in the Netherlands.

          Method. A descriptive qualitative methodology was conducted, using semi-structured individual interviews with six people with a mild intellectual disability. Data were analysed thematically.

          Results. Three overarching themes were found: (i) Missing social contact and having people close; (ii) Being housebound has changed my daily life; and (iii) Hard to understand the preventive measures.

          Conclusions. Important insights into the experiences and needs of people with a mild intellectual disability during the COVID-19 lockdown period were gained. These insights are valuable with respect to a potential second COVID-19 wave or a future infection-outbreak.

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          Most cited references15

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          Using thematic analysis in psychology

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            Psychological Outcomes Associated with Stay-at-Home Orders and the Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Daily Life

            Highlights • Examined impact of COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders on psychological outcomes. • Stay-at-home orders linked to health anxiety, financial worry, and loneliness. • Impact of COVID-19 on life associated with health anxiety and financial worry. • Impact of COVID-19 on life associated with less loneliness and more social support. • Results highlight importance of social connection and need for tele-mental health.
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              Loneliness and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study among Dutch older adults

              Abstract Objectives With the spread of COVID-19, the Netherlands implemented a policy to keep citizens physically distanced. We hypothesize that consequent reduction in the frequency of social contacts, personal losses and the experience of general threats in society reduced well-being. Methods Data were collected from 1,679 Dutch community-dwelling participants aged 65 to 102 years old comprising a longitudinal online panel. Social and emotional loneliness and mental health were measured in May 2020, i.e., two months after the implementation of the measures, and earlier in October and November 2019. Results In this pandemic, not only loneliness of older people increased, but mental health remained roughly stable. The policy measures for physical distancing did not cause much social isolation but personal losses, worries about the pandemic, and a decline in trust in societal institutions were associated with increased mental health problems and especially emotional loneliness. Discussion The consequences of long-term social isolation and well-being must be closely monitored.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Dev Disabil
                Int J Dev Disabil
                International Journal of Developmental Disabilities
                Taylor & Francis
                2047-3869
                2047-3877
                5 October 2020
                2022
                5 October 2020
                : 68
                : 4
                : 578-582
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University , Tilburg, The Netherlands
                [2 ]Amarant , Tilburg, The Netherlands
                [3 ]Philadelphia Zorg , Amersfoort, The Netherlands
                [4 ]Institute of Health & Wellbeing, University of Glasgow , Glasgow, UK
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Petri Embregts, Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University , P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands. Email: p.j.c.m.embregts@ 123456tilburguniversity.edu
                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3567-1528
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4318-8432
                https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8489-8409
                https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8552-7378
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3985-6098
                Article
                1827214
                10.1080/20473869.2020.1827214
                9351556
                35937180
                880a27e0-f140-486f-a6be-4d97208fc30c
                © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.

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                Figures: 0, Tables: 1, Pages: 5, Words: 3562
                Categories
                Research Article
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                intellectual disability,covid-19,corona,pandemic,experiences of people with a mild intellectual disability

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