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      Prevalence and site preferences of heterophyid metacercariae inTilapia zillifrom Ismalia fresh water canal, Egypt

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      Parasite

      EDP Sciences

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          Abstract

          Factors affecting prevalence and site preferences of heterophyid metacercariae (MC) were investigated in this study. A total of 173 specimens of a freshwater fish, Tilapia zilli were collected during autumn 2008, winter 2009 and summer 2009, from Ismailia fresh water canal, Egypt. Results showed that the total prevalence of heterophyid MC was 95.37%. The heterophyid MC consisted of Haplorchis yokogawi (47.4%), Pygidiopsis genata (21.4%), and Phagicola ascolonga (93.64%). H. yokogawi MC was detected in striated muscles, P. ascolonga in liver and kidney while, P. genata was detected in muscles, liver and kidney. The aggregation indices showed that all MC were aggregated and the P. genata was the most highly aggregated followed by H. yokogawi and then P. ascolonga. Responses of the heterophyid MC to host sex, weight and season greatly varied according to species of MC. Different responses of interaction for heterophyid MC intensity were found by GLIM analysis and this variation dependant on the type of infection (single or mixed infections). Factors affecting site preference of heterophid MC infection were discussed and further studies in other locations are required to examine the factors affecting site preference.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Parasite
          Parasite
          EDP Sciences
          1252-607X
          1776-1042
          September 2010
          September 2010
          : 17
          : 3
          : 233-239
          Article
          10.1051/parasite/2010173233
          21073146
          © 2010

          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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          Self URI (journal page): http://www.parasite-journal.org/

          Parasitology, Life sciences

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