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      Climate and sea‐level controlling internal architecture of a Quaternary carbonate ramp (Northwest Shelf of Australia)

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          Most cited references78

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          The Phanerozoic record of global sea-level change.

          K. Miller (2005)
          We review Phanerozoic sea-level changes [543 million years ago (Ma) to the present] on various time scales and present a new sea-level record for the past 100 million years (My). Long-term sea level peaked at 100 +/- 50 meters during the Cretaceous, implying that ocean-crust production rates were much lower than previously inferred. Sea level mirrors oxygen isotope variations, reflecting ice-volume change on the 10(4)- to 10(6)-year scale, but a link between oxygen isotope and sea level on the 10(7)-year scale must be due to temperature changes that we attribute to tectonically controlled carbon dioxide variations. Sea-level change has influenced phytoplankton evolution, ocean chemistry, and the loci of carbonate, organic carbon, and siliciclastic sediment burial. Over the past 100 My, sea-level changes reflect global climate evolution from a time of ephemeral Antarctic ice sheets (100 to 33 Ma), through a time of large ice sheets primarily in Antarctica (33 to 2.5 Ma), to a world with large Antarctic and large, variable Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (2.5 Ma to the present).
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            The salinity, temperature, and delta18O of the glacial deep ocean.

            J Adkins (2002)
            We use pore fluid measurements of the chloride concentration and the oxygen isotopic composition from Ocean Drilling Program cores to reconstruct salinity and temperature of the deep ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our data show that the temperatures of the deep Pacific, Southern, and Atlantic oceans during the LGM were relatively homogeneous and within error of the freezing point of seawater at the ocean's surface. Our chloride data show that the glacial stratification was dominated by salinity variations, in contrast with the modern ocean, for which temperature plays a primary role. During the LGM the Southern Ocean contained the saltiest water in the deep ocean. This reversal of the modern salinity contrast between the North and South Atlantic implies that the freshwater budget at the poles must have been quite different. A strict conversion of mean salinity at the LGM to equivalent sea-level change yields a value in excess of 140 meters. However, the storage of fresh water in ice shelves and/or groundwater reserves implies that glacial salinity is a poor predictor of mean sea level.
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              The abundance of 13C in marine organic matter and isotopic fractionation in the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon during the past 800 Ma

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
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                Journal
                Sedimentology
                Sedimentology
                Wiley
                0037-0746
                1365-3091
                October 22 2021
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR) Geological Institute RWTH Aachen University Wuellnerstrasse 2 Aachen 52062 Germany
                [2 ]Institute of Geosciences CAU Kiel Ludewig‐Meyn‐Strasse 10 Kiel 24118 Germany
                [3 ]School of Earth Sciences University of Melbourne 253‐283 Elgin Street Carlton VIC 3053 Australia
                [4 ]Division of Earth Science The Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation Yamaguchi University Yoshida 1677‐1 Yamaguchi 753‐8511 Japan
                [5 ]Institute of Geosciences CAU Kiel, Otto‐Hahn‐Platz 1 Kiel 24118 Germany
                Article
                10.1111/sed.12948
                8855a10b-3d3e-4be2-bf41-ed9db89deab1
                © 2021

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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