Blog
About

9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Development of a Hybrid Course on Wheelchair Service Provision for clinicians in international contexts

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Introduction

          Wheelchair users worldwide are at high risk of developing secondary health conditions and premature death due to inappropriate wheelchair provision by untrained providers. The International Society of Wheelchair Professionals (ISWP) has developed a Hybrid Course based on the World Health Organization’s Wheelchair Service Training Package—Basic Level. The Hybrid Course leverages online modules designed for low-bandwidth internet access that reduces the in-person training exposure from five to three and a half days, making it less expensive and more convenient for both trainees and trainers.

          Methods

          The Hybrid Course was designed using a systematic approach guided by an international group of stakeholders. The development followed the Quality Matters Higher Educational Rubric, web design guidelines for low bandwidth, experts’ opinions, and the best practices for blended course design. A quasi-experimental approach was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hybrid Course taken by six graduate students in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh by measuring pre- and post knowledge using the validated ISWP Wheelchair Service Provision—Basic Test. The outcome measure was assessed using a paired sample t-test between pretest and posttest scores. The quality of the Hybrid Course was evaluated by three external reviewers using the Quality Matters Higher Educational Rubric who were blind to each others’ evaluation and the results of the training intervention.

          Results

          Hybrid Course participants reported significant increases in scores on the ISWP Wheelchair Service Provision—Basic Test after participating in the training, with an average increase of 10.84±5.42, p = 0.004, Cohen’s d = 1.99. In addition, the Hybrid Course met the Quality Matters Standards in two out of three evaluations and reported a percentage of agreement between evaluators of 84%.

          Conclusions

          The Hybrid Course met quality standards and proved to be effective in increasing basic level wheelchair knowledge in a group of Rehabilitation Science graduate students.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Recommendations for planning pilot studies in clinical and translational research.

          Advances in clinical and translation science are facilitated by building on prior knowledge gained through experimentation and observation. In the context of drug development, preclinical studies are followed by a progression of phase I through phase IV clinical trials. At each step, the study design and statistical strategies are framed around research questions that are prerequisites for the next phase. In other types of biomedical research, pilot studies are used for gathering preliminary support for the next research step. However, the phrase "pilot study" is liberally applied to projects with little or no funding, characteristic of studies with poorly developed research proposals, and usually conducted with no detailed thought of the subsequent study. In this article, we present a rigorous definition of a pilot study, offer recommendations for the design, analysis and sample size justification of pilot studies in clinical and translational research, and emphasize the important role that well-designed pilot studies play in the advancement of science and scientific careers. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Strategies for rehabilitation professionals to move evidence-based knowledge into practice: a systematic review.

            Rehabilitation clinicians need to stay current regarding best practices, especially since adherence to clinical guidelines can significantly improve patient outcomes. However, little is known about the benefits of knowledge translation interventions for these professionals. To examine the effectiveness of single or multi-component knowledge translation interventions for improving knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of rehabilitation clinicians. Systematic review of 7 databases conducted to identify studies evaluating knowledge translation interventions specific to occupational therapists and physical therapists. 12 studies met the eligibility criteria. For physical therapists, participation in an active multi-component knowledge translation intervention resulted in improved evidence-based knowledge and practice behaviors compared with passive dissemination strategies. These gains did not translate into change in clinicians' attitudes towards best practices. For occupational therapists, no studies have examined the use of multi-component interventions; studies of single interventions suggest limited evidence of effectiveness for all outcomes measured. While this review suggests the use of active, multi-component knowledge translation interventions to enhance knowledge and practice behaviors of physical therapists, additional research is needed to understand the impact of these strategies on occupational therapists. Serious research gaps remain regarding which knowledge translation strategies impact positively on patient outcomes.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Engaging stakeholders in rehabilitation research: a scoping review of strategies used in partnerships and evaluation of impacts.

              To describe how stakeholder engagement has been undertaken and evaluated in rehabilitation research.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Funding acquisitionRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Funding acquisitionRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: ResourcesRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                15 June 2018
                2018
                : 13
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America
                [2 ] International Society of Wheelchair Professionals (ISWP), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America
                Universita degli Studi di Perugia, ITALY
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-18-00274
                10.1371/journal.pone.0199251
                6003808
                29906794
                © 2018 Burrola-Mendez et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 8, Pages: 22
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: Advancing Partners & Communities, sub-award through USAID-funded cooperative agreement
                Award ID: APC-GM-0068
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003141, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología;
                Award Recipient :
                This study was produced by ISWP in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, subaward number APC-GM-0068, through Advancing Partners & Communities (APC), a cooperative agreement funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development under Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-12-00047, beginning October 1, 2012. This study is based upon work supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología México (CONACYT) Graduate Student Fellowship to YB. The contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the view of CONACYT. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Biotechnology
                Medical Devices and Equipment
                Assistive Technologies
                Wheelchairs
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Medical Devices and Equipment
                Assistive Technologies
                Wheelchairs
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Human Learning
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Human Learning
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Human Learning
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Learning and Memory
                Learning
                Human Learning
                Computer and Information Sciences
                Computer Networks
                Internet
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Public and Occupational Health
                Global Health
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Services Research
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Public and Occupational Health
                Disabilities
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Cognitive Science
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Cognitive Psychology
                Learning
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Neuroscience
                Learning and Memory
                Learning
                Social Sciences
                Sociology
                Education
                Schools
                Universities
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article