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Sporadic Gene Loss After Duplication Is Associated with Functional Divergence of Sirtuin Deacetylases Among Candida Yeast Species

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      Abstract

      Gene duplication promotes the diversification of protein functions in several ways. Ancestral functions can be partitioned between the paralogs, or a new function can arise in one paralog. These processes are generally viewed as unidirectional. However, paralogous proteins often retain related functions and can substitute for one another. Moreover, in the event of gene loss, the remaining paralog might regain ancestral functions that had been shed. To explore this possibility, we focused on the sirtuin deacetylase SIR2 and its homolog HST1 in the CTG clade of yeasts. HST1 has been consistently retained throughout the clade, whereas SIR2 is only present in a subset of species. These NAD +-dependent deacetylases generate condensed chromatin that represses transcription and stabilizes tandemly repeated sequences. By analyzing phylogenetic trees and gene order, we found that a single duplication of the SIR2/HST1 gene occurred, likely prior to the emergence of the CTG clade. This ancient duplication was followed by at least two independent losses of SIR2. Functional characterization of Sir2 and Hst1 in three species revealed that these proteins have not maintained consistent functions since the duplication. In particular, the rDNA locus is deacetylated by Sir2 in Candida albicans, by Hst1 in C. lusitaniae, and by neither paralog in C. parapsilosis. In addition, the subtelomeres in C. albicans are deacetylated by Sir2 rather than by Hst1, which is orthologous to the sirtuin associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae subtelomeres. These differences in function support the model that sirtuin deacetylases can regain ancestral functions to compensate for gene loss.

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      MAFFT Multiple Sequence Alignment Software Version 7: Improvements in Performance and Usability

      We report a major update of the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program. This version has several new features, including options for adding unaligned sequences into an existing alignment, adjustment of direction in nucleotide alignment, constrained alignment and parallel processing, which were implemented after the previous major update. This report shows actual examples to explain how these features work, alone and in combination. Some examples incorrectly aligned by MAFFT are also shown to clarify its limitations. We discuss how to avoid misalignments, and our ongoing efforts to overcome such limitations.
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        RAxML version 8: a tool for phylogenetic analysis and post-analysis of large phylogenies

        Motivation: Phylogenies are increasingly used in all fields of medical and biological research. Moreover, because of the next-generation sequencing revolution, datasets used for conducting phylogenetic analyses grow at an unprecedented pace. RAxML (Randomized Axelerated Maximum Likelihood) is a popular program for phylogenetic analyses of large datasets under maximum likelihood. Since the last RAxML paper in 2006, it has been continuously maintained and extended to accommodate the increasingly growing input datasets and to serve the needs of the user community. Results: I present some of the most notable new features and extensions of RAxML, such as a substantial extension of substitution models and supported data types, the introduction of SSE3, AVX and AVX2 vector intrinsics, techniques for reducing the memory requirements of the code and a plethora of operations for conducting post-analyses on sets of trees. In addition, an up-to-date 50-page user manual covering all new RAxML options is available. Availability and implementation: The code is available under GNU GPL at https://github.com/stamatak/standard-RAxML. Contact: alexandros.stamatakis@h-its.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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          Selection of conserved blocks from multiple alignments for their use in phylogenetic analysis.

           J Castresana (2000)
          The use of some multiple-sequence alignments in phylogenetic analysis, particularly those that are not very well conserved, requires the elimination of poorly aligned positions and divergent regions, since they may not be homologous or may have been saturated by multiple substitutions. A computerized method that eliminates such positions and at the same time tries to minimize the loss of informative sites is presented here. The method is based on the selection of blocks of positions that fulfill a simple set of requirements with respect to the number of contiguous conserved positions, lack of gaps, and high conservation of flanking positions, making the final alignment more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, alignments of 10 mitochondrial proteins from several completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes belonging to diverse eukaryotes were used as examples. The percentages of removed positions were higher in the most divergent alignments. After removing divergent segments, the amino acid composition of the different sequences was more uniform, and pairwise distances became much smaller. Phylogenetic trees show that topologies can be different after removing conserved blocks, particularly when there are several poorly resolved nodes. Strong support was found for the grouping of animals and fungi but not for the position of more basal eukaryotes. The use of a computerized method such as the one presented here reduces to a certain extent the necessity of manually editing multiple alignments, makes the automation of phylogenetic analysis of large data sets feasible, and facilitates the reproduction of the final alignment by other researchers.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Biological Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, New York 14260
            Author notes
            [1]

            Present address: Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Immunology, National Institute on Aging, National institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224.

            [2 ]Corresponding author: Department of Biological Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, 109 Cooke Hall, Buffalo NY 14260. E-mail: lrusche@ 123456buffalo.edu
            Journal
            G3 (Bethesda)
            Genetics
            G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
            G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
            G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
            G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics
            Genetics Society of America
            2160-1836
            18 August 2016
            October 2016
            : 6
            : 10
            : 3297-3305
            27543294
            5068949
            GGG_033845
            10.1534/g3.116.033845
            Copyright © 2016 Rupert et al.

            This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Figures: 5, Tables: 1, Equations: 0, References: 48, Pages: 9
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            Investigations

            Genetics

            ctg clade, specifically retained ancestral gene, hst1, sir2

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