0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children: Effect of an Asthma Codiagnosis

      , , , , , , , , for the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) Network

      Hospital Pediatrics

      American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common and expensive cause of hospitalization among US children, many of whom receive a codiagnosis of acute asthma. The objective of this study was to describe demographic characteristics, cost, length of stay (LOS), and adherence to clinical guidelines among these groups and to compare health care utilization and guideline adherence between them.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America

          Abstract Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and surgery. These guidelines are intended for use by primary care and subspecialty providers responsible for the management of otherwise healthy infants and children with CAP in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Site-of-care management, diagnosis, antimicrobial and adjunctive surgical therapy, and prevention are discussed. Areas that warrant future investigations are also highlighted.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Efficacy of corticosteroids in community-acquired pneumonia: a randomized double-blinded clinical trial.

            Some studies have shown a beneficial effect of corticosteroids in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), possibly by diminishing local and systemic antiinflammatory host response. To assess the efficacy of adjunctive prednisolone treatment in patients hospitalized with CAP. Hospitalized patients, clinically and radiologically diagnosed with CAP using standard clinical and radiological criteria, were randomized to receive 40 mg prednisolone for 7 days or placebo, along with antibiotics. Primary outcome was clinical cure at Day 7. Secondary outcomes were clinical cure at Day 30, length of stay, time to clinical stability, defervescence, and C-reactive protein. Disease severity was scored using CURB-65 (a severity index for community-acquired pneumonia evaluating Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, and age 65 or older) and Pneumonia Severity Index. We enrolled 213 patients. Fifty-four (25.4%) patients had a CURB-65 score greater than 2, and 93 (43.7%) patients were in Pneumonia Severity Index class IV-V. Clinical cure at Days 7 and 30 was 84/104 (80.8%) and 69/104 (66.3%) in the prednisolone group and 93/109 (85.3%) and 84/109 (77.1%) in the placebo group (P = 0.38 and P = 0.08). Patients on prednisolone had faster defervescence and faster decline in serum C-reactive protein levels compared with placebo. Subanalysis of patients with severe pneumonia did not show differences in clinical outcome. Late failure (>72 h after admittance) was more common in the prednisolone group (20 patients, 19.2%) than in the placebo group (10 patients, 6.4%; P = 0.04). Adverse events were few and not different between the two groups. Prednisolone (at 40 mg) once daily for a week does not improve outcome in hospitalized patients with CAP. A benefit in more severely ill patients cannot be excluded. Because of its association with increased late failure and lack of efficacy prednisolone should not be recommended as routine adjunctive treatment in CAP.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Separation of individual-level and cluster-level covariate effects in regression analysis of correlated data.

              The focus of this paper is regression analysis of clustered data. Although the presence of intracluster correlation (the tendency for items within a cluster to respond alike) is typically viewed as an obstacle to good inference, the complex structure of clustered data offers significant analytic advantages over independent data. One key advantage is the ability to separate effects at the individual (or item-specific) level and the group (or cluster-specific) level. We review different approaches for the separation of individual-level and cluster-level effects on response, their appropriate interpretation and give recommendations for model fitting based on the intent of the data analyst. Unlike many earlier papers on this topic, we place particular emphasis on the interpretation of the cluster-level covariate effect. The main ideas of the paper are highlighted in an analysis of the relationship between birth weight and IQ using sibling data from a large birth cohort study. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Hospital Pediatrics
                Hospital Pediatrics
                American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
                2154-1663
                2154-1671
                August 01 2015
                August 01 2015
                : 5
                : 8
                : 415-422
                Article
                10.1542/hpeds.2015-0007
                26231631
                © 2015

                Comments

                Comment on this article