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      SIMULATING THE IMPACTS OF INDOOR VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS ON HVAC PERFORMANCE USING eQUEST AT HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE'S R. W. KERN CENTER

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          INTRODUCTION

          Hampshire College, in Amherst, Massachusetts, is taking part in the green building movement with the construction of the R. W. Kern Center, which opened in the spring of 2016. The building was certified to meet the Living Building Challenge in spring 2018 and has satisfied building standards such as Net Zero energy and water. To meet these standards, the design of the building employs solar photovoltaic panels, a rain water catchment and purification system, a greywater treatment system, storm water infiltration rain gardens, composting toilets, and control monitoring systems to make the building more efficient and decrease its harmful impacts on the environment. The greywater treatment system utilizes both indoor vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCW) and an outdoor horizontal flow constructed wetland (HFCW) to filter greywater effluent from sinks and a coffee bar, meeting the requirement to treat and handle all wastewater generated on site. Although the VFCW system performance has been shown to be effective in exterior environments (Sklarz et al., 2009), its use inside a building requires scrutiny to verify that the adoption of this system does not affect the operation of essential building systems.

          The green systems that the Kern Center and others like it are employing may have impacts on the building's environment, construction and operation. These modifications must be monitored, and their effects quantified. The alteration of the thermal and air quality characteristics of the interior building has a significant effect on occupant health and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) energy on consumption. Several studies have investigated the benefits of indoor plants for air filtration or for exterior greywater filtration.

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          A comprehensive analysis of the impact of occupancy parameters in energy simulation of office buildings

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Spring 2018
                : 13
                : 2
                : 121-144
                Author notes

                1. School of Natural Science, Hampshire College, Amherst MA, MatthewAllenRaymond@ 123456gmail.com

                2. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, School of Natural Science, Hampshire College, Amherst MA, shNS@ 123456Hampshire.edu

                3. Associate Professor of Hydrology, School of Natural Science, Hampshire College, Amherst MA, ccNS@ 123456Hampshire.edu

                Article
                jgb.13.2.121
                10.3992/1943-4618.13.2.121
                © 2018 College Publishing
                Page count
                Pages: 24
                Product
                Categories
                NEW DIRECTIONS IN TEACHING AND RESEARCH

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