3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Standing in the shadows of plants

      1
      Plants, People, Planet
      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references22

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Senescence, ageing and death of the whole plant.

          696 I. 697 II. 697 III. 699 IV. 700 V. 703 VI. 704 VII. 707 708 References 708 This review considers the relationship between the lifespan of an individual plant and the longevity of its component cells, tissues and organs. It begins by defining the terms senescence, growth, development, turnover, ageing, death and program. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating phase change from juvenility to maturity influence directly the capacity for responding to senescence signals and factors determining reproduction-related patterns of deteriorative ageing and death. Senescence is responsive to communication between sources and sinks in which sugar signalling and hormonal regulation play central roles. Monocarpy and polycarpy represent contrasting outcomes of the balance between the determinacy of apical meristems and source-sink cross-talk. Even extremely long-lived perennials sustain a high degree of meristem integrity. Factors associated with deteriorative ageing in animals, such as somatic mutation, telomere attrition and the costs of repair and maintenance, do not seem to be particularly significant for plant lifespan, but autophagy-related regulatory networks integrated with nutrient signalling may have a part to play. Size is an important influence on physiological function and fitness of old trees. Self-control of modular structure allows trees to sustain viability over prolonged lifespans. Different turnover patterns of structural modules can account for the range of plant life histories and longevities. © 2012 The Author. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Plant behaviour and communication.

            Plant behaviours are defined as rapid morphological or physiological responses to events, relative to the lifetime of an individual. Since Darwin, biologists have been aware that plants behave but it has been an underappreciated phenomenon. The best studied plant behaviours involve foraging for light, nutrients, and water by placing organs where they can most efficiently harvest these resources. Plants also adjust many reproductive and defensive traits in response to environmental heterogeneity in space and time. Many plant behaviours rely on iterative active meristems that allow plants to rapidly transform into many different forms. Because of this modular construction, many plant responses are localized although the degree of integration within whole plants is not well understood. Plant behaviours have been characterized as simpler than those of animals. Recent findings challenge this notion by revealing high levels of sophistication previously thought to be within the sole domain of animal behaviour. Plants anticipate future conditions by accurately perceiving and responding to reliable environmental cues. Plants exhibit memory, altering their behaviours depending upon their previous experiences or the experiences of their parents. Plants communicate with other plants, herbivores and mutualists. They emit cues that cause predictable reactions in other organisms and respond to such cues themselves. Plants exhibit many of the same behaviours as animals even though they lack central nervous systems. Both plants and animals have faced spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments and both have evolved plastic response systems.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Preventing Plant Blindness

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Plants, People, Planet
                Plants People Planet
                Wiley
                25722611
                July 2019
                July 2019
                July 26 2019
                : 1
                : 3
                : 130-138
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Gothenburg University; Gothenburg Sweden
                Article
                10.1002/ppp3.10059
                89b6c4e5-f241-4133-ba68-682d361a70d2
                © 2019

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1


                Comments

                Comment on this article