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      Movement of eukaryotic mRNAs between polysomes and cytoplasmic processing bodies.

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          Abstract

          Eukaryotic cells contain nontranslating messenger RNA concentrated in P-bodies, which are sites where the mRNA can be decapped and degraded. We present evidence that mRNA molecules within yeast P-bodies can also return to translation. First, inhibiting delivery of new mRNAs to P-bodies leads to their disassembly independent of mRNA decay. Second, P-bodies decline in a translation initiation-dependent manner during stress recovery. Third, reporter mRNAs concentrate in P-bodies when translation initiation is blocked and resume translation and exit P-bodies when translation is restored. Fourth, stationary phase yeast have large P-bodies containing mRNAs that reenter translation when growth resumes. The reciprocal movement of mRNAs between polysomes and P-bodies is likely to be important in the control of mRNA translation and degradation. Moreover, the presence of related proteins in P-bodies and maternal mRNA storage granules suggests this mechanism is widely adapted for mRNA storage.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Science
          Science (New York, N.Y.)
          American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
          1095-9203
          0036-8075
          Oct 21 2005
          : 310
          : 5747
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0106, USA.
          Article
          1115791 NIHMS20424
          10.1126/science.1115791
          1863069
          16141371
          89bb3522-38c6-4982-89be-50a9f2acd7bc
          History

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