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The functional response and resilience in small waterbodies along land-use and environmental gradients

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      Most cited references 75

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      Global Biodiversity Scenarios for the Year 2100

       O. Sala (2000)
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        Global biodiversity: indicators of recent declines.

        In 2002, world leaders committed, through the Convention on Biological Diversity, to achieve a significant reduction in the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. We compiled 31 indicators to report on progress toward this target. Most indicators of the state of biodiversity (covering species' population trends, extinction risk, habitat extent and condition, and community composition) showed declines, with no significant recent reductions in rate, whereas indicators of pressures on biodiversity (including resource consumption, invasive alien species, nitrogen pollution, overexploitation, and climate change impacts) showed increases. Despite some local successes and increasing responses (including extent and biodiversity coverage of protected areas, sustainable forest management, policy responses to invasive alien species, and biodiversity-related aid), the rate of biodiversity loss does not appear to be slowing.
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          Consequences of changing biodiversity.

          Human alteration of the global environment has triggered the sixth major extinction event in the history of life and caused widespread changes in the global distribution of organisms. These changes in biodiversity alter ecosystem processes and change the resilience of ecosystems to environmental change. This has profound consequences for services that humans derive from ecosystems. The large ecological and societal consequences of changing biodiversity should be minimized to preserve options for future solutions to global environmental problems.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]College of Liberal Arts (CoLA); Bath Spa University; Bath UK
            [2 ]Geography; Earth and Environmental Sciences; University of Birmingham; Birmingham UK
            [3 ]Freshwater Habitats Trust; Headington Oxford UK
            [4 ]Institute of Science and the Environment; University of Worcester; Worcester UK
            [5 ]School of Applied Sciences; Edinburgh Napier University; Edinburgh UK
            [6 ]Research Institute for the Built and Human Environment; School of Environment and Life Sciences; University of Salford; Salford Greater Manchester UK
            [7 ]Department of Geography; Centre for Hydrological and Ecosystem Science; Loughborough University; Loughborough Leicestershire UK
            [8 ]IBERS (Institute of Biological, Environmental & Rural Sciences); Aberystwyth University; Aberystwyth UK
            [9 ]School of Biology; University of Leeds; Leeds UK
            Journal
            Global Change Biology
            Glob Change Biol
            Wiley
            13541013
            July 2018
            July 2018
            April 24 2018
            : 24
            : 7
            : 3079-3092
            10.1111/gcb.14149
            © 2018

            http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

            http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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