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      Differential Effects of Adenosine on Antegrade Fast Pathway, Antegrade Slow Pathway, and Retrograde Fast Pathway in Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry

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          Abstract

          Adenosine has a potent negative dromotropic effect. However, comparative effects of adenosine on the three pathways of atrioventricular (AV) nodal reentry remain unclear. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of adenosine on the antegrade fast, antegrade slow, and retrograde fast pathway conduction in patients with AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). Twenty patients with common slow-fast AVNRT (mean cycle length 360 ± 49 ms) were studied. The effects of adenosine on the antegrade slow pathway and on the retrograde fast pathway conduction were determined during sustained AVNRT and constant right ventricular pacing at identical cycle lengths (mean 360 ± 49 ms), respectively. Incremental doses of adenosine were rapidly administered: initial dose of 0.5 mg, followed by stepwise increases of 0.5 or 1.0 mg given at 5-min intervals until termination of AVNRT or second-degree ventriculoatrial block occurred. After the antegrade slow pathway conduction was selectively and completely ablated by radiofrequency catheter ablation, the effect of adenosine on the antegrade fast pathway conduction was evaluated. The dose-response curve of adenosine and the dose of adenosine required to produce AV or ventriculoatrial block among the representative three conduction pathways were compared. The dose-response curve for the effect of adenosine on the antegrade fast pathway lies to the left and upward to that of the effect of adenosine on the antegrade slow pathway which in turn lies to the left and upward to that of the retrograde fast pathway. The mean dose of adenosine required to produce conduction block at antegrade fast, antegrade slow, and retrograde fast pathways were 1.4 ± 0.5, 4.2 ± 1.6, and 8.5 ± 2.6 mg, respectively (p < 0.01). Adenosine has a differential potency to depress antegrade fast, antegrade slow, and retrograde fast pathway conduction in patients with AVNRT. The depressant effect of adenosine on the antegrade fast pathway is more potent than that on the antegrade slow pathway which in turn is more potent than that on the retrograde fast pathway conduction.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          CRD
          Cardiology
          10.1159/issn.0008-6312
          Cardiology
          S. Karger AG
          0008-6312
          1421-9751
          2002
          June 2002
          12 June 2002
          : 97
          : 3
          : 147-154
          Affiliations
          Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC
          Article
          63331 Cardiology 2002;97:147–154
          10.1159/000063331
          12077567
          © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

          Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

          Page count
          Figures: 5, References: 21, Pages: 8
          Categories
          Arrhythmias, Electrophysiology, and Electrocardiography

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