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      Separation of eight selected flavan-3-ols on cellulose thin-layer chromatographic plates

      , ,
      Journal of Chromatography A
      Elsevier BV

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          Tea catechins and polyphenols: health effects, metabolism, and antioxidant functions.

          Increasing interest in the health benefits of tea has led to the inclusion of tea extracts in dietary supplements and functional foods. However, epidemiologic evidence regarding the effects of tea consumption on cancer and cardiovascular disease risk is conflicting. While tea contains a number of bioactive chemicals, it is particularly rich in catechins, of which epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant. Catechins and their derivatives are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects ascribed to tea. Tea catechins and polyphenols are effective scavengers of reactive oxygen species in vitro and may also function indirectly as antioxidants through their effects on transcription factors and enzyme activities. The fact that catechins are rapidly and extensively metabolized emphasizes the importance of demonstrating their antioxidant activity in vivo. In humans, modest transient increases in plasma antioxidant capacity have been demonstrated following the consumption of tea and green tea catechins. The effects of tea and green tea catechins on biomarkers of oxidative stress, especially oxidative DNA damage, appear very promising in animal models, but data on biomarkers of in vivo oxidative stress in humans are limited. Larger human studies examining the effects of tea and tea catechin intake on biomarkers of oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA are needed.
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            Review on polyphenols in Theobroma cacao: changes in composition during the manufacture of chocolate and methodology for identification and quantification

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              Catechin contents of foods commonly consumed in The Netherlands. 1. Fruits, vegetables, staple foods, and processed foods.

              Catechins, compounds that belong to the flavonoid class, are potentially beneficial to human health. To enable epidemiological evaluation of these compounds, data on their contents in foods are required. HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection was used to determine the levels of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-gallocatechin (GC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) in 24 types of fruits, 27 types of vegetables and legumes, some staple foods, and processed foods commonly consumed in The Netherlands. Most fruits, chocolate, and some legumes contained catechins. Levels varied to a large extent: from 4.5 mg/kg in kiwi fruit to 610 mg/kg in black chocolate. (+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin were the predominant catechins; GC, EGC, and ECg were detected in some foods, but none of the foods contained EGCg. The data reported here provide a base for the epidemiological evaluation of the effect of catechins on the risk for chronic diseases.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Chromatography A
                Journal of Chromatography A
                Elsevier BV
                00219673
                June 2005
                June 2005
                : 1077
                : 2
                : 188-194
                Article
                10.1016/j.chroma.2005.03.096
                8a6ea6e5-7bd8-4689-962b-d9b82bbe1ea5
                © 2005

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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