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      The feasibility and satisfaction of an online global health education course at a single medical school: a retrospective study

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and satisfaction of an online global health education course for medical students in comparison with an in-person of the course and to assess students’ preferences regarding online methods of delivery.

          Methods

          Second-year medical students enrolled in this course in 2019 (in-person) and 2020 (online). The attendance rate, satisfaction in the course evaluation survey, and academic achievement on the written final examination were utilized to compare the two different methods of course delivery. The medical students who took the online course were also asked about their preferences regarding the method of course delivery and the advantages and drawbacks of each method of online lectures.

          Results

          There was no significant difference in the attendance rate and overall satisfaction between the two groups. The mean score on the written examination of the online course (84.1±19.6) showed comparable effects to the in-person course (78.0±18.3). The percentages of students who achieved high performance (55.5%) and the achieved minimum requirement (95.9%) were also maintained compared to the in-person course (14.6% and 93.6%, respectively). Medical students preferred the online course to the in-person course; in particular, they preferred prerecorded videos over live streaming online lectures.

          Conclusion

          The participation, satisfaction, and the academic achievement of the online course were comparable to those of the in-person course. However, the greatest drawback of the online course was the lack of interaction between peer learners. Therefore, diverse methods for online education should be considered to increase students’ sense of belonging to a learning community.

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          Most cited references18

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          Health professionals for a new century: transforming education to strengthen health systems in an interdependent world.

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            The impact of COVID-19 on the undergraduate medical curriculum

            ABSTRACT The coronavirus pandemic has impacted medical education globally. As universities seek to deliver medical education through new methods of modalities, this continuing of education ensures the learning of the future workforce of the NHS. Novel ways of online teaching should be considered in new medical curricula development, as well as methods of delivering practical skills for medical students online.
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              Web-based learning: sound educational method or hype? A review of the evaluation literature.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Korean J Med Educ
                Korean J Med Educ
                KJME
                Korean Journal of Medical Education
                Korean Society of Medical Education
                2005-727X
                2005-7288
                December 2020
                30 November 2020
                : 32
                : 4
                : 307-315
                Affiliations
                [1 ]JW LEE Center for Global Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                [2 ]London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK
                [3 ]Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                [4 ]Office of Medical Education, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                Author notes
                Corresponding Author: Hyun Bae Yoon ( https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4367-5350) JW LEE Center for Global Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 71 Ihwajang-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03087, Korea Office of Medical Education, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea Tel: +82.2.740.8418 Fax: +82.2.745.6373 email: hbyoon@ 123456snu.ac.kr
                Article
                kjme-2020-178
                10.3946/kjme.2020.178
                7733732
                33296574
                8aa8995a-6741-4039-9448-6019e3b702bf
                © The Korean Society of Medical Education. All rights reserved.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

                undergraduate medical education,online education

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