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      Oral Intake of Specific Bioactive Collagen Peptides Reduces Skin Wrinkles and Increases Dermal Matrix Synthesis

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          Abstract

          Dietary consumption of food supplements has been found to modulate skin functions and can therefore be useful in the treatment of skin aging. However, there is only a limited number of clinical studies supporting these claims. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effectiveness of the specific bioactive collagen peptide (BCP) VERISOL® on eye wrinkle formation and stimulation of procollagen I, elastin and fibrillin biosynthesis in the skin was assessed. A hundred and fourteen women aged 45-65 years were randomized to receive 2.5 g of BCP or placebo, once daily for 8 weeks, with 57 subjects being allocated to each treatment group. Skin wrinkles were objectively measured in all subjects, before starting the treatment, after 4 and 8 weeks as well as 4 weeks after the last intake (4-week regression phase). A subgroup was established for suction blister biopsies analyzing procollagen I, elastin and fibrillin at the beginning of the treatment and after 8 weeks of intake. The ingestion of the specific BCP used in this study promoted a statistically significant reduction of eye wrinkle volume (p < 0.05) in comparison to the placebo group after 4 and 8 weeks (20%) of intake. Moreover a positive long-lasting effect was observed 4 weeks after the last BCP administration (p < 0.05). Additionally, after 8 weeks of intake a statistically significantly higher content of procollagen type I (65%) and elastin (18%) in the BCP-treated volunteers compared to the placebo-treated patients was detected. For fibrillin, a 6% increase could be determined after BCP treatment compared to the placebo, but this effect failed to reach the level of statistical significance. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the oral intake of specific bioactive collagen peptides (Verisol®) reduced skin wrinkles and had positive effects on dermal matrix synthesis.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Oral Supplementation of Specific Collagen Peptides Has Beneficial Effects on Human Skin Physiology: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

          Various dietary supplements are claimed to have cutaneous anti-aging properties; however, there are a limited number of research studies supporting these claims. The objective of this research was to study the effectiveness of collagen hydrolysate (CH) composed of specific collagen peptides on skin biophysical parameters related to cutaneous aging. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 69 women aged 35-55 years were randomized to receive 2.5 g or 5.0 g of CH or placebo once daily for 8 weeks, with 23 subjects being allocated to each treatment group. Skin elasticity, skin moisture, transepidermal water loss and skin roughness were objectively measured before the first oral product application (t0) and after 4 (t1) and 8 weeks (t2) of regular intake. Skin elasticity (primary interest) was also assessed at follow-up 4 weeks after the last intake of CH (t3, 4-week regression phase). At the end of the study, skin elasticity in both CH dosage groups showed a statistically significant improvement in comparison to placebo. After 4 weeks of follow-up treatment, a statistically significantly higher skin elasticity level was determined in elderly women. With regard to skin moisture and skin evaporation, a positive influence of CH treatment could be observed in a subgroup analysis, but data failed to reach a level of statistical significance. No side effects were noted throughout the study.
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            Skin ageing: a comparison between Chinese and European populations. A pilot study.

             C Bouillon,  Lin Li,  I Tardy (2005)
            Although limited data are available, it is commonly considered that Europeans and Asians have different skin ageing features. The present studies have been carried out to evaluate the influence of age and sun-exposure on the main clinical signs of Asian skin ageing. One hundred and sixty Chinese and 160 French age-matched women (age range: 20-60 years old) were clinically examined and scored by the same dermatologist. Facial wrinkles (crow's-feet, glabella and perioral wrinkles) and pigmented spots (on face and hands) were assessed in situ and standardized photographs of the face were taken. Lifelong sun-exposure was estimated from answers to a questionnaire. Comparisons were made between 10-year age groups. Results show that, for each facial skin area, wrinkle onset is delayed by about 10 years in Chinese women as compared to French women. Facial wrinkling rate over the years is linear in French women and not linear in Chinese women who appear to experience a fast ageing process between age 40 and 50. Pigmented spot intensity is a much more important ageing sign in Chinese women (severe for 30% of women over 40) than in French women (severe for less than 8% of women, irrespective of age). These first results underline that main skin ageing features (wrinkles, spots) progress differently in the Chinese and French women we have studied. They require to be confirmed on broad multicentre studies involving larger cohorts.
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              Effects of collagen peptide ingestion on UV-B-induced skin damage.

              The effect of daily ingestion of collagen peptide on the skin damage induced by repeated UV-B irradiation was examined. Ingestion of collagen peptide (0.2 g/kg/d) suppressed UV-B-induced decreases in skin hydration, hyperplasia of the epidermis, and decreases in soluble type I collagen. These results suggest that collagen peptide is beneficial as a dietary supplement to suppress UV-B-induced skin damage and photoaging.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                SPP
                Skin Pharmacol Physiol
                10.1159/issn.1660-5527
                Skin Pharmacology and Physiology
                S. Karger AG
                1660-5527
                1660-5535
                2014
                February 2014
                24 December 2013
                : 27
                : 3
                : 113-119
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Dermatology, University of Kiel, and bCollagen Research Institute, Kiel, and cSkin Investigation and Technology, Hamburg, Germany; dDepartment of Cell and Developmental Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
                Author notes
                *Professor E. Proksch, Christian Albrecht University of Kiel, Department of Dermatology, Schittenhelmstrasse 7, DE-24105 Kiel (Germany), E-Mail EProksch@dermatology.uni-kiel.de
                Article
                355523 Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2014;27:113-119
                10.1159/000355523
                24401291
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 1, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Original Paper

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