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      Live lecture versus video podcast in undergraduate medical education: A randomised controlled trial

      1, 2, 3

      BMC Medical Education

      BioMed Central

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          Abstract

          Background

          Information technology is finding an increasing role in the training of medical students. We compared information recall and student experience and preference after live lectures and video podcasts in undergraduate medical education.

          Methods

          We performed a crossover randomised controlled trial. 100 students were randomised to live lecture or video podcast for one clinical topic. Live lectures were given by the same instructor as the narrator of the video podcasts. The video podcasts comprised Powerpoint™ slides narrated using the same script as the lecture. They were then switched to the other group for a second clinical topic. Knowledge was assessed using multiple choice questions and qualitative information was collected using a questionnaire.

          Results

          No significant difference was found on multiple choice questioning immediately after the session. The subjects enjoyed the convenience of the video podcast and the ability to stop, review and repeat it, but found it less engaging as a teaching method. They expressed a clear preference for the live lecture format.

          Conclusions

          We suggest that video podcasts are not ready to replace traditional teaching methods, but may have an important role in reinforcing learning and aiding revision.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Web-based learning: sound educational method or hype? A review of the evaluation literature.

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            Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

            In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.
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              Computer-based teaching is as good as face to face lecture-based teaching of evidence based medicine: a randomized controlled trial.

              Assessing in undergraduate medical education the educational effectiveness of a short computer-based session, integrating a lecturer's video with a standardized structure, for evidence based medicine (EBM) teaching, compared to a lecture-based teaching session of similar structure and duration. A concealed, randomized controlled trial of computer based session versus lecture of equal duration (40 minutes) and identical content in EBM and systematic reviews. The study was based at the Medical School, University of Birmingham, UK involving one hundred and seventynine year one medical students. The main outcome measures were change from pre to post-intervention score measured using a validated questionnaire assessing knowledge (primary outcome) and attitudes (secondary outcome). Participants' improvement in knowledge in the computer based group was equivalent to the lecture based group (gain in score: 0.8 [S.D = 3.2] versus 1.3 [S.D = 2.4]; p = 0.24). Attitudinal gains were similar in both groups. Computer based teaching and typical lecture sessions have similar educational gains.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1]Rheumatology Department, Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, London, UK
                [2]Care of the Elderly, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK
                [3]Statistical Advisory Service, Imperial College, London, UK
                Contributors
                Journal
                BMC Med Educ
                BMC Medical Education
                BioMed Central
                1472-6920
                2010
                8 October 2010
                : 10
                : 68
                2958969
                1472-6920-10-68
                20932302
                10.1186/1472-6920-10-68
                Copyright ©2010 Schreiber et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Research Article

                Education

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