5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Cystic lesions of the parotid gland: radiologic-pathologic correlation according to the latest World Health Organization 2017 Classification of Head and Neck Tumours

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 54

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Congenital cystic masses of the neck: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

           K Koeller,  L Alamo,  C Adair (2015)
          Cervical congenital cystic masses constitute an uncommon group of lesions usually diagnosed in infancy and childhood. The most common congenital neck mass is the thyroglossal duct cyst. The diagnosis is easily established from the presence of a cystic lesion in the anterior midline portion of the neck. The vast majority of branchial cleft cysts arise from the second branchial cleft. They can occur anywhere from the oropharyngeal tonsillar fossa to the supraclavicular region of the neck. Cystic hygroma is the most common form of lymphangioma. In the neck, cystic hygromas are most commonly found in the posterior cervical space. They typically extend into adjacent structures without respecting the fascial planes. Dermoid and epidermoid cysts result from sequestration of ectodermal tissue. The floor of the mouth is the most common location in the neck. Cervical thymic cysts are very uncommon lesions and are found anywhere from the angle of the mandible down to the sternum. Laryngoceles are classified into internal, external, and mixed types and have a frequent association with laryngeal carcinoma.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Parotid gland tumors: can addition of diffusion-weighted MR imaging to dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging improve diagnostic accuracy in characterization?

            To determine the value of adding diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to dynamic contrast material-enhanced MR imaging when distinguishing between benign and malignant parotid tumors. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and the informed consent requirement was waived. The authors analyzed MR images of 50 lesions (36 benign, 14 malignant) in 47 patients. DW MR imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging were performed in all patients. Time-intensity curve (TIC) patterns were categorized as follows: type A, time to peak was more than 120 seconds; type B, time to peak was 120 seconds or less with high washout ratio (> or = 30%); type C, time to peak was 120 seconds or less with low washout ratio (< 30%); and type D, flat. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured on DW MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for type A, B, and D tumors regarded as benign and for type C tumors regarded as malignant. On the basis of DW MR imaging results, ADC threshold values between pleomorphic adenomas and carcinomas and between Warthin tumors and carcinomas were selected. Diagnostic accuracy was compared before and after modification diagnosis referring to the ADC value obtained with the McNemar test. P < .05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. ADC threshold values were 1.4 x 10(-3) mm(2)/sec between pleomorphic adenomas and carcinomas and 1.0 x 10(-3) mm(2)/sec between Warthin tumors and carcinomas. Accuracy (82% vs 94%) and positive predictive value (67% vs 92%) significantly improved with the addition of ADC values in the evaluation of patients with type B or C tumors. A persistent or flat TIC pattern on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images indicates benign disease, but there is added value from including the ADC value in the evaluation of tumors that show a plateau or washout TIC pattern. RSNA, 2008
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              MR imaging of parotid tumors: typical lesion characteristics in MR imaging improve discrimination between benign and malignant disease.

               A Christe (corresponding) ,  C Waldherr,  R Hallett (2011)
              The surgical approach to parotid tumors is different for benign and malignant neoplasms, but the clinical symptoms do not correlate well with histology. Difficulties in tumor classification also arise in imaging modalities, in which sonography has the lowest and MR imaging, the highest accuracy. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using conventional MR imaging of the neck in the evaluation of parotid tumors and to evaluate which MR imaging findings are best able to predict malignant histology. Eighty-four consecutive patients (43 males, 41 females; median age, 56 years; range, 9-85 years) with parotid gland tumors who underwent MR imaging before surgery were prospectively included in the present study and retrospectively analyzed. Histology was available for all tumors. We analyzed the following MR imaging parameters: signal intensity, contrast enhancement, lesion margins (well-defined versus ill-defined), lesion location (deep/superficial lobe), growth pattern (focal, multifocal, or diffuse), and extension into neighboring structures, perineural spread, and lymphadenopathy. The 57 (68%) benign and 27 (32%) malignant tumors consisted of 29 pleomorphic adenomas, 17 Warthin tumors, 11 various benign tumors, 5 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 3 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 1 acinic cell carcinoma, 1 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, 9 metastases, and 8 various malignant neoplasms. Specific signs predictive of malignancy were the following: T2 hypointensity of the parotid tumor (P = .048), ill-defined margins (P = .001), diffuse growth (P = .012), infiltration of subcutaneous tissue (P = .0034), and lymphadenopathy (P = .012). Low signal intensity on T2-weighted images and postcontrast ill-defined margins of a parotid tumor are highly suggestive of malignancy.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Japanese Journal of Radiology
                Jpn J Radiol
                Springer Nature
                1867-1071
                1867-108X
                November 2017
                August 23 2017
                November 2017
                : 35
                : 11
                : 629-647
                Article
                10.1007/s11604-017-0678-z
                © 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article